2015-16 Departmental Performance Report – Section IV: Supplementary Information

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This section provides additional information in support of the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report and includes the following subsections:

Table of contents

Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Sub-Program 1.1.1: International Information and Analysis

Description: Government of Canada decision makers are provided with information products such as mission reports, information memorandums and political and economic research so that they are well informed on issues related to Canada’s international values and interests.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
24,843,92922,272,831-2,571,098Footnote 1
Human Resources (Full Time Equivalents [FTEs])
PlannedActualDifference
2032041
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetResult
Government of Canada decision makers are well-informed on issues related to Canada’s international interests and values.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, Global Affairs Canada’s information and analysis products met the Government of Canada decision-makers’ expectations for content and relevance to Canada’s international interests and values.44.9

Sub-Program 1.1.2: International Policy Advice

Description: Through this sub-program, Government of Canada decision makers are provided with decision products such as action memorandums, briefing notes, memorandums to Cabinet, and presentations so that they are well advised on options for actions and policies regarding Canada’s international values and interests.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
55,096,05353,936,466-1,159,587
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
631612-19
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetResult
Government of Canada decision makers are well advised on options for actions and policies affecting Canada’s international interests and values.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, the policy advice provided by Global Affairs met the Government of Canada decision-makers’ quality criteria for content and relevance to Canada’s broad international values and interests.44

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy

Description: Through this sub-program, démarches, official visits, public diplomacy, and other access and advocacy initiatives are used to make bilateral and regional decision makers aware of Canada’s international policies and priorities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
201,276,934196,549,283-4,727,651
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
1,1781,19618
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Bilateral and regional foreign decision-makers are aware and show evidence of decision and action outcomes supporting Canada’s international policies and priorities.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, key influencers were reached through events, visits and outreach programs.44.58
Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, key influencers were engaged through events, visits and outreach programs.43.75
Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, protocol services facilitate interactions between Canadian and foreign decision makers.55

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy

Description: Through this sub-program, démarches, official visits, public diplomacy, and other access and advocacy initiatives are delivered to make summit and multilateral decision makers aware of Canada’s international policies and priorities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
61,341,81761,003,339-338,478
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
1911954
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Summit and multilateral decision-makers are aware of Canada’s international policies and priorities.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, foreign representatives and decision-makers were reached through consultations, negotiations, events, visits, and/or via delivery of programs and projects.45
Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, selected foreign representatives and decision-makers were engaged.43.8
Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, protocol services facilitated interactions between Canadian and foreign decision-makers at summit and multilateral events.55

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: This sub-program enables the timely payment of assessed contributions and membership dues that maintain Canada’s access to more than 40 international and multilateral organizations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
606,914,604664,905,00557,990,401
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
11110
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canada is able to access international organizations to contribute to and share responsibility for the management of international issues.% of payments of assessed contributions to multilateral organizations of which Canada is a member that are paid in full.100%100%
% of payments of assessed contributions to multilateral organizations of which Canada is a member that are made on time.100%100%

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Trade Agreements, Negotiations, Dispute Settlement and Controls

Description: Through this sub-program, Global Affairs Canada works to mitigate market access barriers for Canadian industry by negotiating trade, investment and air transportation agreements, addressing trade policy issues through diplomacy and international dispute settlement mechanisms, and managing Canada’s international obligations under the Export and Import Permits Act to control trade in specific goods and technologies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
56,510,99932,499,219-24,011,780Footnote 2
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
261242-19Footnote 3
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
The negotiation of international trade agreements at the bilateral, regional and multilateral levels maintains or improves global market access for Canada.# of agreements concluded (including free trade agreements, air transport agreements and foreign investment promotion and protection agreements).1019
Market access barriers faced by Canadian industry abroad and international trade disputes are resolved or mitigated.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, systemic market access barriers, disputes or other strategic policy issues were effectively resolved or mitigated in conjunction with partners, stakeholders and foreign interests.44
Canada’s obligations to control trade in specific goods and technologies are met.% of permits and other documents processed in accordance with service delivery standards.95%97%

Sub-Program 2.1.1: International Business Development through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad

Description: This sub-program helps link Canadian business clients to services, contacts and leads that increase access to international commerce opportunities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
142,938,463124,690,099-18,248,364Footnote 4
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
1,1781,158‑20
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canadian business clients gain access to services, contacts and leads that increase access to international commerce opportunities.# of business/trade leads disseminated.5,0004,456
% of clients actively pursuing commercial agreements.55%61%
% of clients indicating the Trade Commissioner Service helped them connect with customers, partners or other contacts that otherwise would have been difficult to identify/access.60%64%

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Foreign Direct Investment in Canada

Description: This sub-program helps ensure that foreign investors are aware of Canada as a competitive investment location and supports efforts to ensure that foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
24,811,35524,197,291-614,064
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
951016Footnote 5
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Foreign investors are aware of Canada as a competitive investment location.# of potential foreign investors at investment-specific events.1,0003,039
% of potential foreign investors who increased their awareness of Canada as a competitive investment location.75%94%
Foreign investors demonstrate interest in Canadian investment locations.# of investment visits to Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.100170

Sub-Program 2.1.3: International Innovation, Science and Technology

Description: This sub-program helps Canadian business clients gain access to networks, partners and resources that enhance their ability to innovate.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
13,467,42515,571,9112,104,486Footnote 6
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
51521
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canadian business clients gain access to networks, partners and resources that enhance their ability to innovate.# of international research and innovation partnerships facilitated by the TCS.100203
# of international research innovation leads disseminated.250391

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Consular Assistance for Canadians

Description: This sub-program helps ensure that Canadians travelling abroad receive timely and accurate information on travelling safely and responsibly. Canadians in distress abroad are provided with consular assistance and routine citizenship, passport and consular services through Canada’s network of missions abroad.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
27,001,57126,658,239-343,332
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
247230-17Footnote 7
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canadians travelling abroad receive timely and accurate information on how to travel safely and responsibly.% increase in the number of subscribers to travel updates.15%128%
Canadians in distress abroad receive timely consular assistance.% of distress cases actioned within 24 hours (all distress cases).85%85%
Canadians abroad receive satisfactory routine citizenship, passport, and consular services.% of clients responding that the quality of consular services was satisfactory (timeliness of services, accuracy of information and courteousness of staff).90%94%

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Emergency Preparedness and Response

Description: This sub-program enables Canadians abroad to receive timely and appropriate emergency consular services and maintains a whole-of-government capacity to respond to international emergencies in a timely and coordinated manner.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
22,120,02721,746,227-373,800
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
143141-2
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate emergency consular services.% of inquiries to which the Emergency Watch and Response Centre responded that met established standards.80%95%
% of Registration of Canadians Abroad messages sent to registrants according to established standards.100%100%
Whole-of-government capacity to respond to emergencies is maintained.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, emergency response capacity is maintained.44

Sub-Program 3.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction

Description: This sub-program enhances the capacity of foreign governments and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats of transnational crime, terrorism, and weapons and materials of mass destruction.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
229,406,907219,921,958-9,484,949
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
8983-6Footnote 8
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Strengthened international response times to peace and security challenges, including crisis coordination, by Canadian government.# of international crises that Global Affairs Canada responded to in a timely fashion.Obtain baseline information3
Strengthened government institutions and civil society in fragile and conflict affected states supported by Global Affairs Canada.# of government institutions and civil society organizations in fragile and conflict affected states supported by Global Affairs Canada and capable of providing better services to their communities during crisis situations.Obtain baseline information95
Strengthened capacity of Global Affairs Canada’s program beneficiaries to prevent and respond to transnational security threats posed by international crime, terrorism, and weapons and materials of mass destruction through the provision of equipment, training and infrastructure with Global Affairs Canada’s support.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, Global Affairs Canada’s program beneficiaries are better able to prevent, mitigate, and respond to transnational security threats posed by international crime, terrorism, and weapons and materials of mass destruction as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Obtain baseline information4.5

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

Description: Through this sub-program, Global Affairs Canada promotes the development and maintenance of democratic, well-governed, pluralistic societies whose accountable governments respond effectively to the needs of their citizens, including respect for human rights and the rule of law.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
149,800,433144,495,452-5,304,981
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
5954-5Footnote 9
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Enhanced or maintained participation in democratic decision-making processes as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, international partners are better able to enhance or maintain participation in democratic decision-making processes as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Obtain baseline information3.5
Increased promotion, protection, and respect for the rule of law and human rights, including religious freedom, as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, international partners are better able to protect and promote the rule of law and human rights, including religious freedom, as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Obtain baseline information3.5
Increased civil society influence on the responsiveness of public institutions to the needs and rights of people and entities as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, civil society partners in select countries have greater capacity to seek to influence laws and regulations that respond to the needs and rights of peoples as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Obtain baseline information3

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

Description: This sub-program helps developing countries improve their capacity to manage and grow their economies and increase economic opportunities for their citizens. It focuses on improving the broad investment climate, enabling the growth of small-scale businesses, especially those led by women, and investing in the employment and entrepreneurial skills of individuals, particularly women and youth.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
776,937,103776,182,309-754,794
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
223201-22Footnote 10
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Strengthened investment climate of regions and countries in a sustainable way in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# (out of total) of recommended laws, regulations, amendments and/or codes enacted, eliminated and/or revised to support lasting, inclusive and environmentally sustainable economic growth in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 21 Programs and 61 Initiatives Footnote 11
Increased access to business development and financial services for micro, small and medium-sized enterprises, particularly those led by women, in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises benefiting from business development services and/or with access to financial services (including micro finances) in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 32 Programs and 66 Initiatives
Increased participation of individuals, particularly women and youth, in economic activities in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of people with jobs following completed training in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 30 Programs and 91 Initiatives

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

Description: This sub-program contributes to the well-being and empowerment of children and youth in targeted developing countries by improving maternal, newborn and child health services, increasing equitable access to quality education and learning opportunities, and enhancing protection from violence, exploitation and abuse.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
1,209,405,4681,199,182,740-10,222,728
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
291270-21Footnote 12
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Increased equitable access to integrated and comprehensive health services for children and mothers in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of women with a live birth who received antenatal care by a skilled health provider in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 14 Programs and 99 Initiatives
Increased completion of quality basic education and learning opportunities by girls, boys and youth in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of boys and girls who complete a basic education in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 17 Programs and 52 Initiatives
Enhanced protection of girls, boys and youth in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of vulnerable girls and boys reached with child protection services in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 17 Programs and 41 Initiatives

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Food Security

Description: This sub-program contributes to food security in developing countries by increasing sustainable agricultural production and productivity of small-holder farms, and strengthening agricultural innovation systems. It also promotes consumption of nutritious foods or supplements for food to insecure, undernourished or food aid dependent families.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
336,081,493333,705,198-2,376,295
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
117107-10Footnote 13
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Increased sustainable agricultural production and productivity for rural small-holder farmers, in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of farmers supported to sustainably increase production in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 10 Programs and 62 Initiatives
Strengthened agricultural innovation systems in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of farmers using agricultural innovation in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 9 Programs and 36 Initiatives
Enhanced consumption of nutritious foods or supplements for food insecure, undernourished or food aid dependent populations in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of people reached through Global Affairs Canada’s nutritional programming in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 10 Programs and 53 Initiatives

Sub-Program 3.2.4: Multisector Assistance, Social Development, and Development Engagement

Description: This sub-program provides development assistance that complements targeted interventions of other development programming, and enables the continued engagement of Canadians as global citizens. It includes programming in health and social services that does not specifically target children and youth, including the prevention and treatment of communicable diseases.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
175,119,885171,878,411-3,241,474
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
129118-11
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Increased effectiveness of multilateral and global development organizations supported by Global Affairs Canada.% (out of total) of organizations funded by Global Affairs Canada, assessed by the Multilateral Organisation Performance Assessment Network during the reporting period receiving a score of “adequate” on their development effectiveness ratings.Obtain baseline informationActual result on this indicator will be available in 2016-17.
Increased engagement of Canadians as global citizens.# of Canadians engaged as global citizens to support international development efforts in Canada and abroad as a result of Global Affairs Canada support.Obtain baseline informationOver 3 million
Enhanced prevention and treatment of communicable diseases in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in development programming.# of people supported to fight communicable diseases in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationContributing to this Outcome: 5 Programs and 29 Initiatives

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Humanitarian Programming

Description: This sub-program delivers timely and effective humanitarian assistance to crisis-affected populations in developing countries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
272,487,102583,172,541310,685,439Footnote 14
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
2422-2
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Enhanced Global Affairs Canada response to humanitarian crises in countries where Canada engages in humanitarian assistance.# of countries facing complex emergencies, with identified humanitarian needs, responded to by Global Affairs Canada.Obtain baseline information57
# of natural disasters, with identified humanitarian needs, responded to by Global Affairs Canada.Obtain baseline information27

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Partners for Humanitarian Assistance

Description: This sub-program provides long-term institutional support to key humanitarian assistance partners to improve their effectiveness and ensure continued capacity to deliver humanitarian assistance in an ever-evolving global political and environmental context.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
118,366,234116,930,671-1,435,563
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
2018-2
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetResult
Improved effectiveness of humanitarian action by the international humanitarian system.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, progress was made on the implementation of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s Transformative Agenda.Obtain baseline information4

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Management of Common Services

Description: This sub-program provides the costing framework for common services, such as logistics support, banking and financial services, procurement and diplomatic mail services, at Canada’s missions abroad so that clients and partners at missions receive cost-effective and efficient common services and infrastructure support.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
122,775,055135,228,17112,453,116Footnote 15
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
2,2392,2478
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canadian missions abroad and mission partners receive timely and cost-effective common services and mission network support.% of service standard response times in compliance with the Service Level Agreement (diplomatic mail, procurement/logistics).75%83%
% of common-service requests (transportation, materiel/property) actioned within service standards.80%98%
% of common-service requests (materiel/property) re-opened by clients after completion.5%0.6%
Compensation and benefits services are provided in a timely and accurate manner.% of partners who agree that human resources services were in compliance with established service standards.75%83%

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Real Property

Description: This sub-program facilitates centralized decision making on property planning and project management so that the Government of Canada receives timely and cost-effective property services and maintenance in support of its programs abroad.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
413,182,409387,977,138-25,205,271Footnote 16
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
156136‑20Footnote 17
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canadian missions abroad and mission partners receive timely and efficient real property services in support of programs abroad.% of program managers who indicate that the mission platform offers functional real property for the delivery of their programs.85%80%
% of operating and capital dollars (excluding rents) re-invested to preserve the value of Crown assets.Footnote 184%Footnote 190.85%

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Security

Description: This sub-program provides cyclical on-site security inspections complemented by ongoing risk assessments and safety audits to ensure that missions are secure, personnel are safe, and federal partners’ and other co-locators’ assets and information are protected at missions abroad. It includes the implementation of the Departmental Security Plan, through which work in this Sub-Program is coordinated and monitored.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
63,222,33352,015,724-11,206,609Footnote 20
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
26427511
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Missions are secure, personnel are safe, and government and partner assets and information are protected at missions abroad.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, the implementation of security measures to address the priority risks identified in the Departmental Security Plan are on track to be completed as planned.43

Sub-Program 4.1.4: Information Management/Information Technology (IM/IT)

Description: This sub-program facilitates the dissemination of service standards and delivers IM/IT services across Canada’s network of missions abroad.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
45,233,77143,478,093-1,755,678
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
259255-4
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Efficient and cost-effective information management/ information technology (IM/IT) services are delivered.% of mission procurement requests for IM/IT goods and services made using Shop@GAC that met service delivery standards.80%67%Footnote 21
% of mission call centre requests for IM services addressed that met service delivery standards.95%99.98%
% of mission call centre requests for IT services addressed that met service delivery standards.95%91.5%

Sub-Program 4.1.5: Locally Engaged Staff Supporting Other Government Departments

Description: This sub-program enables Locally Engaged Staff supporting other government departments at missions to receive timely and efficient salary payments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
74,129,21274,966,825837,613
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
1,3561,37418
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Locally engaged staff (LES) supporting other government departments (OGDs) receive timely and cost-effective salary determination.% of LES supporting OGDs managed according to updated Terms and Conditions of Employment.90%100%
% of salary adjustments to LES supporting OGDs implemented in a timely manner.90%100%

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Administration of Foreign Service Directives

Description: This sub-program delivers Foreign Service Directives benefits and services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
145,223,806166,791,14821,567,342Footnote 22
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
4534-11
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Canadian-based staff (CBS) and their dependents are satisfied with services related to allowances and other benefits they receive under the Foreign Service Directives (FSD).% of CBS (at missions and who relocated back to Canada or to missions) who responded that they were satisfied with FSD services.75%85%
CBS and their dependents have a good level of knowledge and awareness of FSD benefits and related services.% of CBS (at missions and who relocated back to Canada or to missions) who responded that they had a good awareness of FSD benefits, policy and procedures.75%91%

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Administration of Locally Engaged Staff Pension, Insurance and Social Security Programs

Description: This sub-program administers pension and insurance plans and enrolment in local social security programs for Locally Engaged Staff (LES) who work at Canada’s missions abroad. This includes providing information regarding pensions, insurance, social security programs and delivering of timely and accurate payments to LES.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 
Planned SpendingActual SpendingDifference
54,501,77667,586,53613,084,760Footnote 23
Human Resources (FTEs)
PlannedActualDifference
2119-2
Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsResults
Timely and accurate pension, insurance and social security services are delivered.% of Locally Engaged Staff (LES) who indicated they were aware of where to obtain information on pensions, insurance and social security programs and appropriate service standards.75%73%
% of LES who received services within service standards pertaining to pensions, insurance and social security programs.75%83%

Supplementary Information Tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government’s Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013-16 guides the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Global Affairs Canada supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities described in this supplementary information table. This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy presents the results for Theme I –Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, and Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government.

2. Themes I to III: Department- and Agency-Led Targets

FSDS Performance Results
FSDS GoalFSDS Performance IndicatorFSDS TargetFSDS Performance Status
Goal 1 – Climate change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.1.1 Expected impact of actions to meet the reduction target.1.1 Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020 (Minister of Environment and Climate Change).In support of Goal 1.1, Global Affairs Canada provided legal services and advice for the international climate change negotiations and coordinated financial obligations (1.1.51).

3. Themes I to III: Implementation Strategies

Implementation Strategies for International Work on Climate Change - Enabling Capacity

4. Theme IV: Targets and Implementation Strategies

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Performance Measurement of Target 7.2
Expected resultPerformance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of April 1, 2014.Although a draft policy was created, it was not finalized or submitted for approval due to competing priorities and resource limitations. Planned completion date is now November 30, 2016. However, the Policy on Green Procurement will remain the default until Global Affairs Canada’s policy is approved.
Number and percentage of procurement and/or materiel management specialists who completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2015-16.62 out of 65 (95 percent) procurement and/or materiel management specialists completed the course C215.
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in fiscal year 2015–16.All (100 percent) performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel contain provisions that support and contribute to green procurement.
Departmental green procurement target #1

By March 31, 2017, 95 percent of copy-paper purchases contain a minimum of 30 percent recycled content of equivalent certification.

Performance Measurement of target #1
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Percentage of paper purchases meeting the target relative to total amount (in dollar or volume) of all paper purchases in the given year.Public Works and Government Services Canada standing offers were used to procure 96 percent of the paper requests for Global Affairs Canada (49 out of 51). The standing offer stipulates paper manufactured in conditions that meet or exceed requirements based on the UL 2771 (formerly known as EcoLogo™ Standard CCD-077) must be available.
Departmental green procurement target #2

By March 31, 2017, 60 percent of purchases of chairs, cabinets, shelving, panels and desks will be environmentally preferred models.

Performance Measurement of target #2
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Percentage of purchases of chairs, cabinets, shelving, panels and desks meeting the target relative to total amount (in dollar or volume) of all purchases in the given year.At least 69 percent of domestic and 95 percent of international purchases met this requirement.
Departmental green procurement target #3

By March 31, 2017, 60 percent of purchases of copy paper, envelopes, notebooks, file folders, binders, writing instruments, toner cartridges and batteries will have environmental features.

Performance Measurement of target #3
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Percentage of office supply purchases meeting the target relative to total dollar value (or volume) of all office supply purchases in the given year.PWGSC standing offers that include many environmental features were used to procure 89 percent of the office supplies. Purchases made with acquisition cards were excluded from this indicator.
Performance Measurement of Implementation strategy element or best practice of target #3
Implementation strategy element or best practicePerformance level achieved
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible.Achieved
Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.
Achieved
Best Practice
7.2.4. Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers.
Achieved
Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Performance Measurement of Target 7.3
Expected resultPerformance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place by March 31, 2015.Achieved. The Policy on Materiel Management was approved in January 2015. The Policy addresses the need to support government-wide objectives, such as sustainable development strategies and green procurement policies at the federal level.
Performance Measurement of Implementation strategy element or best practice of Target 7.3
Implementation strategy element or best practicePerformance level achieved
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices.Achieved
7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles.Achieved
7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e. printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).Achieved
7.3.1.4. Minimize the ratio of information technology (IT) assets per employee.Achieved
7.3.1.5. Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage.Achieved
7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.Achieved
7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner.Achieved
7.3.1.8. Minimize all non-hazardous solid waste generated, and leverage service offerings to maximize the diversion of waste.Achieved
7.3.1.9. Increase the population density in office buildings, and increase space utilization in special purpose buildings.Achieved (within Canada)
7.3.1.10. Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management.Achieved (within Canada)

5. Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

Not applicable (N/A)

6. Sustainable Development Management System

In 2015-16, Global Affairs Canada ensured that its decision-making process included consideration of the relevant FSDS goals and targets through application of the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals (Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process) and environmental reviews under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012. The results of SEAs are made public when respective initiatives are announced demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process. No projects subject to reviews under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act resulted in significant adverse environmental effects with the application of appropriate mitigation measures. For additional details on Global Affairs Canada’s activities in support of sustainable development, see the department’s Sustainable Development website. For more information, please see the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2015-16 reporting cycle, Global Affairs Canada considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. In accordance with the Cabinet Directive, Global Affairs Canada developed the Framework for Conducting Environmental Assessments of Trade Negotiations, which establishes the process and analytical requirements for conducting assessments and systemically identifies and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of an initiative, such as a free trade agreement. Additionally, the Handbook for Conducting Environmental Assessments of Trade Negotiations supplements the Framework and serves as a guide for federal government officials engaged in conducting strategic environmental assessments of trade negotiations. Through the strategic environmental assessment process, departmental proposals were found to have neutral to positive effects on progress toward the 2013-16 FSDS goals and targets in Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government. Additional information on the results of the strategic environmental assessments is available on the department’s Sustainable Development and Environmental Assessment of Trade Negotiations web pages.

Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program (ACCBP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: December 9, 2009

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2015-16 (amended)

Strategic Outcome: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 3.1: International Security and Democratic Development / Sub-Program 3.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction

Description: The ACCBP provides assistance to enhance the capacity of beneficiary states to prevent and respond to threats posed by international criminal activity, with a global mandate and a focus on the Americas. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: The ACCBP achieved its expected outcome of increasing the capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and respond to criminal activity, as demonstrated by the results below:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants9,728,0792,675,8577,000,0007,683,3237,683,323683,323
Total contributions7,541,9703,167,1485,601,7826,693,2656,682,9401,081,158
Total program17,270,0495,843,00512,601,78214,376,58814,366,2631,764,481

Comments on variances: An additional $2,216,036 was absorbed from the Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program. In addition, a $10,325-gain was realized on currency exchange.

Audits completed or planned: The ACCBP participates in the department’s recipient audit process for Grant and Contribution programs, which adopts a risk-based approach to auditing selected recipients.

Evaluations completed or planned: The ACCBP underwent a formative evaluation in 2014-15, which was approved in 2015-16; the results are set to be published in mid‑2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The program delivers programming via Government of Canada departments and agencies, plus selected multilateral institutions, foreign governments, non-governmental organizations and private entities.

Canada Fund for Local Initiatives

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Fund for Local Initiatives (CFLI) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: April 1, 2012

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.1: Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy

Description: The CFLI is a contribution program that aligns with Canada’s priorities for international assistance, particularly advancing democracy and ensuring security and stability. The program is delivered through Canada’s missions abroad in countries that are eligible for official development assistance. The program is intended to assist in the advocacy of Canada’s values and interests and the strengthening of Canada’s bilateral relations with the governments and civil societies of foreign countries. Through contribution agreements, the CFLI provides monetary assistance to cover all or a portion of the cost of projects that are generally between $25,000 and $50,000 and conceived and designed by local authorities, institutions or organizations. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions6,930,41214,007,64534,100,00014,222,24813,859,610‑20,240,390
Total program6,930,41214,007,64534,100,00014,222,24813,859,610‑20,240,390

Comments on variances: The variance between planned spending and actual spending is primarily attributable to the unused portion of funds related to the Crisis Pool Quick Release Mechanism ($19.4 million). The remaining variance ($840,390) was due to a compressed CFLI project cycle (i.e. allocations were released in late July 2015), the release of the International Assistance Envelope 5-percent holdback in October 2015 and unused funds from the special thematic envelope on religious freedom, as well as unused humanitarian relief funds. Overall, 94.3 percent of CFLI funds were spent. Plans to bring expectations and capacity into alignment where applicable include releasing funds to missions earlier in the fiscal year, allocating more funds initially to avoid late year disbursements and working more closely with missions on the more timely return of unspent funds in order to reallocate them to other missions.

Audits completed or planned: The Office of the Chief Audit Executive undertook an internal audit of the CFLI for the 2015‑2016 fiscal year. The results of this audit are expected to be presented in September 2016.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was completed during the 2015-16 fiscal year. The Evaluation Division had completed a draft report on the CFLI from 2012‑2013 to 2013‑2014 during the 2014-15 fiscal year. The final report was expected to be released in fall 2015 but has not yet been released.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: CFLI initiatives focused on Canada’s international priorities were highly visible and served to engage key bilateral influencers, particularly in civil society.

Key influencers were reached through heads of mission visits and announcements, as well as media coverage of these events and by monitoring visits to CFLI projects in the host country.

Local stakeholders are aware of Canadian values and have enhanced capacities to support democracy, security and stability, and improved local participation in crisis response efforts.

Commonwealth Secretariat

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Commonwealth Secretariat (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: September 28, 1965

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2006-07

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.2: Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s assessed contribution to the regular budget of the Commonwealth is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of Canada’s membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and, to this end, to enhance relationships among the 53 Commonwealth member countries. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Financial contributions

Summit

Democracy

Economic and Social Development

Youth

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions5,620,2406,035,5606,875,6026,839,1706,839,170-36,432
Total program5,620,2406,035,5606,875,6026,839,1706,839,170-36,432

Comments on variances: Variances between planned and actual amounts reflect changing exchange rates, as Commonwealth invoices are issued in pounds sterling.

Audits completed or planned: No audits have been conducted or are planned by Global Affairs Canada. The Commonwealth Secretariat’s Board of Governors, comprising representatives from member states, including Canada, receives an annual audit and acts on any opinions therein.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation is expected in 2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Engagement is ongoing. For more details, visit the Commonwealth Secretariat website.

Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program 

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program (CTCBP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: September 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2015-16 (amended)

Strategic Outcome: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 3.1: International Security and Democratic Development / Sub-Program 3.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction

Description: The CTCBP provides training, equipment, infrastructure and technical assistance to enhance the capacity of key beneficiary states, government entities and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats posed by terrorist activity. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: The CTCBP achieved its expected outcome of increasing the capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and respond to criminal activity, as demonstrated by some of the results below:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants5,176,9936,478,3795,470,0008,642,7068,642,7063,172,706
Total contributions7,530,8557,927,8984,900,00016,743,44516,700,52211,800,522
Total program12,707,84814,406,27710,370,00025,386,15125,343,22814,973,228

Comments on variances: The CTCBP increased program spending by $14,973,228 by absorbing funding from other programs that were anticipating underspends. This enabled additional CTCBP projects to be undertaken in FY 2015-16, largely in direct response to an increase in needs related to enhanced engagement by Canada in the Global Coalition against ISIL.

Audits completed or planned: The CTCBP participates in the department’s recipient audit process for Grant and Contribution programs, which adopts a risk-based approach to auditing selected recipients.

Evaluations completed or planned: The CTCBP underwent a formative evaluation in 2014-15, which was approved in 2015-16; the results are set to be published in mid‑2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The CTCBP delivers programming via Government of Canada departments and agencies, selected multilateral institutions, foreign governments, non-governmental organizations and private entities.

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: 1945 

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the FAO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to agricultural development and to provide Canada with a voice in the international community. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

For further details, please refer to FAO’s Programme Implementation Report 2014-15, which informs member states about the work carried out and the results achieved by the Organization during the 2014‑2015 biennium.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions16,580,44417,116,94417,329,74119,022,92219,022,9221,693,181
Total program16,580,44417,116,94417,329,74119,022,92219,022,9221,693,181

Comments on variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and member states, including Canada, are legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits completed or planned: The FAO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Global Markets Support Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Markets Support Program (GMSP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: December 11, 2008

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2015-16

Strategic Outcome: International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians - Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 2.1: International Commerce / Sub-Program 2.1.1: International Business Development through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad / Sub-Program 2.1.2: Foreign Direct Investment in Canada / Sub-Program 2.1.3: International Innovation, Science and Technology

Description: The GMSP harmonizes previously existing programs, a five-year foreign trade zone component and a five-year exports and trade component under one umbrella mechanism:

The objective of the program is to build a stronger and more competitive Canadian capacity to compete in the global economy. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: Overall, the global finding is that the results achieved from GMSP-funded activities are contributing to a stronger Canadian capacity to compete in the global economy, as evidenced by questionnaire responses that 85 percent of communities reported having improved ability to better service prospective investors and 95 percent of associations reported having improved ability to conduct international business; and as furthermore evidenced by questionnaire responses that more Canadian companies are involved in international business, ongoing R&D collaboration with foreign partners, ongoing generation of foreign direct investment, and creation or retention of jobs.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions5,410,7995,496,2626,955,8558,539,1896,256,127-699,728
Total program5,410,7995,496,2626,955,8558,539,1896,256,127-699,728

Comments on variances: Only two applications were approved by the FTZ-MP during the fiscal year, resulting in a lapse of $294,187. In addition, projects funded by the other GMSP pillars are approved based on estimates; however, actual expenditures were lower in some cases.

Further, actual spending for 2015-16 also includes outstanding payable at year-end payments; as such, total spending for 2015-16 may be lower than reported in the above table.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation was completed in February 2015. It concluded that the results of all sub-programs of the GMSP contribute to Canadian economic growth and prosperity, which can be calculated in the millions of dollars, far in excess of program costs. To note, due to timing, the new FTZ-MP and CanExport pillars were beyond the scope of the evaluation.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The GMSP administers an annual recipient questionnaire allowing recipients to provide direct feedback to program management.

Global Partnership Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Partnership Program (GPP) 2013‑2018 (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: April 1, 2013 

End Date: March 31, 2018

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2013-14

Strategic Outcome: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 3.1: International Security and Democratic Development / Sub-Program 3.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction

Description: The GPP is responsible for the implementation of Canada’s participation in the 31-partner Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (the Global Partnership). The GPP was renewed for an additional $367 million over five years (2013‑2018) to address emerging weapons of mass destruction (WMD) proliferation threats globally, corresponding with the then-G8’s decision to expand the Global Partnership’s geographic focus. The GPP implements cooperative WMD threat reduction projects in the following priority areas: nuclear and radiological security; biological security; support for the implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1540; chemical weapons destruction; and countering WMD knowledge proliferation.

Results Achieved: The GPP achieved its expected outcome of increasing the capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and respond to criminal activity, as demonstrated by some of the results below:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants19,668,06319,982,99821,050,00018,286,08318,286,083-2,763,917
Total contributions19,709,92814,973,76042,440,00030,590,00029,968,958-12,471,042
Total program39,377,99134,956,75863,490,00048,876,08348,255,041-15,234,959

Comments on variances: The Program did not use an additional $15.2 million due to lack of project initiation authorizations in the first half of the fiscal year. The GPP transferred $14.2 million to other divisions that were experiencing funding gaps, as follows: $1.5 million to the Office of Religious Freedom; $6.7 million to the Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program to meet an increased programming need related to enhanced engagement by Canada in the Global Coalition against ISIS; $5 million to the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force; and $1 million to the department’s Non-Proliferation and Disarmament division. The GPP ended the year with a $1.03-million lapse; due to project agreements being pushed to the next fiscal year. The GPP is now planning its programming based on a model of authorizations as defined by the Delegation of Authorities and is on track to fully expend 2016-17 funding.

Audits completed or planned: The GPP participates in the department’s recipient audit process for grant and contribution programs, which adopts a risk-based approach to auditing selected recipients.

Evaluations completed or planned: The GPP underwent a formative evaluation in 2014-15, which was approved in 2015-16. The results are due to be published in mid‑2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The GPP engages continuously with the 31-member Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction to identify global needs and conducts matchmaking to link potential donors with recipients. The GPP also engages with relevant multilateral institutions (e.g. IAEA, WHO, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, INTERPOL, UN) to identify and engage potential partners. In addition, the GPP uses the Government of Canada’s global network of missions to identify potential project initiatives and also undertakes targeted outreach and assessment missions to countries identified through its regular priority-setting exercise.

Global Peace and Security Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: September 18, 2006

End Date: March 31, 2016 

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2014-15

Strategic Outcomes: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 3.1: International Security and Democratic Development / Sub-Program 3.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction

Description: The Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) responds to the on-going international demand for Canadian support and involvement in complex crises, including conflicts and natural disasters, and coordinates whole-of-government engagements in fragile and conflict-affected states. The Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF) is administered by START for the purposes of funding Canada’s standing institutional capacity, as well as to provide international assistance to prevent and respond to crises in support of stabilization and reconstruction in affected states. The Fund is also used to support START policy analysis and development, crisis analysis and planning, coordination activities and program management, as well as international election observation missions, police and civilian deployments, and related programming delivered by other federal departments and agencies. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: Enhanced regional and global stability during crisis situations as a result of Global Affairs Canada initiatives, as demonstrated by:

Strengthened international response times to peace and security challenges by the Canadian government, demonstrated through the effective whole-of-government, civilian-led coordination of Canada’s response to the April 2015 earthquake in Nepal, which resulted in deployment of the Department of National Defence (DND) Disaster Assistance Response Team within eight days of the disaster, the deployment of Global Affairs Canada’s emergency stockpiles, and the donation of $51.7 million in humanitarian assistance.

Through START, Canada supported 92 government institutions and civil society organizations in fragile and conflict affected states, including:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants16,023,05729,946,58345,000,00044,581,73644,581,736-418,264
Total contributions44,387,36353,164,66655,000,00059,081,26858,161,6263,161,626
Total program60,410,42083,111,249100,000,000103,663,004102,743,3622,743,362

Comments on variances: Minor negative variance in grants attributable to the re-profiling of GPSF grants funds to allow for increased contributions programming. The additional contribution spending that exceeded planned spending/available authorities arose from the re-profiling of International Security Contributions funds from other Programs (e.g. Global Partnership Program). The re-profiling of Transfer Payment funds was undertaken in response to departmental and governmental priorities.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation was conducted in 2015-16. No further evaluations are planned.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: A GPSF application template (as well as general information and objectives about the program) are posted on the START website.

Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2015-16 (amended)

Strategic Outcome: International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians - Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 2.1: International Commerce / Sub-Program 2.1.1: International Business Development through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad

Description: These grants and contributions expand international education programs to more effectively and efficiently advance departmental priorities, which include contributing to Canada’s competitiveness in the education sector and promoting democracy, the rule of law and human rights. Recipients are not required to repay grant funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: Raised awareness of Canada among future leaders, decision makers and the general public in foreign countries, as measured by:

Canada’s knowledge advantage is recognized worldwide and serves to strengthen Canadian interests and economic prosperity, as measured by:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants1,554,2671,283,8002,530,0001,423,8901,185,825-1,344,175
Total contributions6,082,6086,047,2214,587,6276,110,0966,110,0961,522,469
Total program7,636,8757,331,0217,117,6277,533,9867,295,921178,294

Comments on variances: The variance between planned and actual spending in 2015-16 was related to the identification of additional funding from elsewhere in the department that was provided to support approved but unfunded Academic Relations activities. Most of the funding was provided as grants, but the majority of activities were more applicable to the characteristics of contributions, which explains the conversion of some grants to contributions.

Audits completed or planned: A program audit was completed in 2009-10, and an audit is planned for 2018-19.

Evaluations completed or planned: The decision was made to continue the program following the results of the last completed evaluation in fiscal year 2009-10. The planned completion of the next evaluation is fiscal year 2018-19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Promotion of programs by 53 missions, collaborations on a weekly basis with non-governmental organizations, participation in nine education conferences and forums, and one collaboration mission of international academic institutional leaders from the Americas to Canada took place in 2015-16.

International Scholarships News releases – RSS Feeds: 41

International Scholarships website statistics:

Grants in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations’ Property in Canada

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants in lieu of taxes on diplomatic, consular and international organizations’ property in Canada (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 18, 1979

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 1978-79

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.1 Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy

Description: The Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations’ Property Grants Order (P.C.1979-59, January 18, 1979), the Municipal Grants Act, and successor orders and acts form the statutory basis of this program. This transfer program is also designed to fulfill obligations under the Foreign Missions and International Organizations Act. The related memorandum of understanding between Global Affairs Canada, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and the National Capital Commission, establishes responsibilities and procedures governing the provision of services related to the payment of grants in lieu of real property and frontage or area taxes with respect to diplomatic and consular property. These procedures are designed to ensure fiscal and operational accountability while promoting efficient program delivery.

Results Achieved: Canada’s international commitments were met, as demonstrated by:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions13,017,22513,503,80413,516,00015,853,99913,804,944288,944
Total program13,017,22513,503,80413,516,00015,853,99913,804,944288,944

Comments on variances: The variance between the planned and actual spending is due to lower than anticipated municipal realty taxes. Changes in the volume and entitlement of grants, in particular the volume of grants for properties established in Quebec, are other factors in the year-end variance.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation is planned for 2016-17.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

International Atomic Energy Agency

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: December 19, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the IAEA is a legally binding obligation of membership. Payment is made to ensure that membership is in good standing and to maintain influence and credibility in a key international body, the aims of which Canada supports. The IAEA is the world’s centre of cooperation in the nuclear field and it works to further the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technology, in particular by verifying that states adhere to their commitments to use nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions14,485,02314,416,70614,437,25814,706,13914,706,139268,881
Total program14,485,02314,416,70614,437,25814,706,13914,706,139268,881

Comments on variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations, for which Canada assumes any loss.

Audits completed or planned: The IAEA’s Office of Internal Oversight Services provides functions such as internal audit, program monitoring, program evaluation, inspections, consulting and investigations. The IAEA also appoints an external auditor to audit the IAEA’s accounts. The current external auditor is the Chairman of the Audit Board of the Republic of Indonesia.

Canada’s representatives to the IAEA have access to all audit and financial reports produced by the various oversight bodies and presented to the Board of Governors or General Conference. Global Affairs Canada officials are able to review these reports and advocate Canadian issues, as required.

Evaluations completed or planned: The IAEA’s Office of Internal Oversight Services conducts evaluations of IAEA programs and projects on an ongoing basis. Evaluation reports are made available to the Board of Governors each May.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

International Criminal Court

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Criminal Court (ICC) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: April 1, 2005 

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: The ICC is the first permanent, treaty-based, international criminal court established to help end impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious crimes of concern to the international community. Although the Court’s operating expenses are funded by states parties, it also receives contributions from governments, international organizations, individuals, corporations and other entities. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions9,161,8078,249,8849,187,68410,078,23310,078,233890,549
Total program9,161,8078,249,8849,187,68410,078,23310,078,233890,549

Comments on variances: The ICC’s annual program budget is approved by the ASP in November of the preceding year. For financial planning purposes, Canada is required to estimate the ICC program budget well in advance of its adoption. Unanticipated events, such as the arrest of an individual on a long-outstanding warrant, can result in significant increases to the Court’s budget. As a result, there is always some variance between the anticipated contribution and the assessed contribution.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Canada is an active participant in the annual ASP of the ICC and on the Committee on Budget and Finance. The Embassy of Canada to the Netherlands is in regular direct contact with Court officials and, together with the Permanent Mission of Canada to the United Nations in New York, participates in working groups dealing with governance and finance issues affecting the Court. Canada, together with the six other largest contributors to the ICC’ s budget, is pressing for further budget efficiencies.

International Development Assistance

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Development Assistance

Start Date: 2001-02

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2012-13 

Strategic Outcome: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Links to the organization’s programs:

Description: The Official development assistance (ODA) activities contribute to poverty reduction, take into account the perspectives of the poor, and are consistent with international human rights standards, as per the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act (the Act). The ODA may also be provided for the purposes of alleviating the effects of a natural or man-made disaster or other emergency occurring outside Canada. Global Affairs Canada is the lead department responsible for Canada's ODA. The majority of the department's international assistance activities meet the requirements of the Act. However, Global Affairs Canada's transfer payment program does not preclude activities falling outside the scope of the Act. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: In 2015-16, Global Affairs Canada continued to support Canada's engagement in developing countries, with an emphasis on 25 countries of focus and 12 development partner countries. Canadian development projects focused on achieving results within four thematic sub-programs: Sustainable Economic Growth; Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (MNCH); Food Security; and Multisector Assistance, Social Development and Development Engagement. Please consult Strategic Outcome 3 in Section 3 of the Departmental Performance Report for more information on Global Affairs Canada’s international development programs and performance results.

Performance Information (dollars)
 Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
1.1 Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development PolicyTotal grants000000
Total contributions000000
Total program000000
3.1 International Security and Democratic DevelopmentTotal grants043,252,66080,087,25278,771,96365,683,546-14,403,706
Total contributions077,328,41564,895,87493,001,16971,953,6587,057,784
Total program0120,581,075144,983,126171,773,132137,637,204-7,345,922
3.2 International DevelopmentTotal grants01,090,738,6401,551,598,3571,526,116,1511,220,187,995-331,410,362
Total contributions0830,640,543622,344,309891,871,000871,321,950248,977,641
Total program01,921,379,1832,173,942,6662,417,987,1512,091,509,945-82,432,721
3.3 International Humanitarian AssistanceTotal grants0783,400,147364,463,080358,477,431677,494,004313,030,924
Total contributions011,510,09819,903,74328,523,71417,129,305-2,774,438
Total program0794,910,245384,366,823387,001,145694,623,309310,256,486
TotalTotal grants01,917,391,4471,996,148,6891,963,365,5451,963,365,545-32,783,144
Total contributions0919,479,056707,143,9261,013,395,883960,404,913253,260,987
Total02,836,870,5032,703,292,6152,976,761,4282,923,770,458220,477,843

Comments on variances:

Audits completed or planned:

The following audits were completed during the 2015-16 fiscal year:

Evaluations completed or planned:

The following evaluations were initiated or completed during the 2015-16 fiscal year:

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Please see Strategic Outcome 3 in Section III of the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report for more details.

International Financial Institutions

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Financial Institutions (IFIs) as per the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act.

Start Date: N/A

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: N/A

Strategic Outcome: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Links to the organisation’s programs:

Description: International financial institutions such as the World Bank and the regional development banks (including the African Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the Caribbean Development Bank, and the Inter-American Development Bank) provide financial services and focus on country-specific development solutions. Payments to IFIs are made in accordance with sections 3(a), 3(c) and section 12 of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act. These include direct payment to the institutions to enable the IFIs to finance their concessional funding windows for assistance to the poorest developing countries and the purchase of shares of the institution. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: Increased effectiveness of Canadian development cooperation through engagement with, and investment in, multilateral and global organizations, to address humanitarian and development challenges, as measured by progress in global food security, health, education, and sustainable economic growth in developing countries.

The multilateral development banks play an important role in advancing sustainable economic growth and fighting poverty. For example, in 2015, Canada’s contributions to regional development banks helped build or upgrade 10,000 kilometres of roads in Asia, increasing mobility and connectivity for millions of people in developing member countries. The contributions also supplied clean water to 166,000 households and improved sanitation services for over three million of people.

In Africa, 441,270 hectares of land has been improved through replanting and reforestation, and 9.6 million people, of whom 4.1 million are women, benefited from improvement in agriculture. Investments also provided or improved connections to electrical services for over 10.8 million people.

In the Caribbean, 30,609 people, of which 15,256 were females, benefited from safer, more rapid transit through the construction or upgrading of 91 kilometres of roads across Belize, the British Virgin Islands, Grenada, Guyana, Montserrat and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Reduced transit times have a significant impact on the lives of women and girls, who typically have more complex commuting patterns due to their family responsibilities. 

In the Americas more broadly, 161,836 MWh of renewable energy was produced through different projects, and 121,663 tons of carbon dioxide was abated as of year-end 2015 through the Canadian Climate Fund for the Private Sector in the Americas with the Inter-American Development Bank Group.

The Canada-International Finance Corporation (IFC) Partnership Fund, established in 2013, supports private sector development work across the Extractive Industries and Financial Inclusion thematic areas, with women’s economic empowerment as a cross-cutting theme. In FY 2014-15 (July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015), through IFC’s work with local governments and the civil society, 71 municipalities in Colombia, Guinea and Mongolia have implemented IFC-recommended best investment practices and facilitated US$2.4 million in financing in Colombia and Guinea. Through the IFC’s work with three financial institutions in Africa, Latin America and Middle East, 5,216 woman borrowers were reached. In these regions, seven new financial products were launched, including micro loan, SME loan, savings account, current account, and term account.

Performance Information (dollars)
 Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Program 3.1 – International Security and Democratic DevelopmentTotal Other transfer payments000227,555227,555227,555
Total program000227,555227,555227,555
Program 3.2 – International DevelopmentTotal Other transfer payments0239,022,627242,009,000285,143,675285,143,67543,134,675
Total program0239,022,627242,009,000285,143,675285,143,67543,134,675
Program 3.3 – International Humanitarian AssistanceTotal Other transfer payments002,991,0002,168,7252,168,725-822,275
Total program002,991,0002,168,7252,168,725-822,275
Program TotalsTotal Other transfer payments0239,022,627245,000,000287,539,955287,539,95542,539,955

Comments on variances: In March 2015, the Minister of International Development and La Francophonie approved $75 million in core funding for the tenth replenishment of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) to be disbursed over three year (from 2015-16 to 2017-18) and $10 million as a complementary contribution for climate change adaptation (in 2015-16). Global Affairs Canada sought additional authorities to be able to disburse a further $37.5 million for the core funding and an additional $10 million for the complementary contribution as both of these were not included in the 2015-16 planned spending. This $47.5 million in additional spending in 2015-16 was offset by available authorities within Global Affairs Canada ($4,960,045), for a net of additional spending of $42,539,955.

Audits completed or planned: The IFIs share their audited financial statements through annual reports.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Canada plays an active role as a member of the boards of governors of the IFIs. In this capacity, Canada joins with other member countries to provide policy guidance and to approve programs, policies and projects.

International Labour Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Labour Organization (ILO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The ILO was founded in 1919, and Canada has been a member since inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the ILO, a UN specialized agency, is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international labour and social policy issues and provide it with a voice in the international community. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

For further details, please refer to the ILO’s latest available Performance Report, which informs member states about the work carried out and the results achieved by the Organization during the 2014‑2015 biennium.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions13,418,26513,363,10313,912,11914,827,27714,827,277915,158
Total program13,418,26513,363,10313,912,11914,827,27714,827,277915,158

Comments on variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and member states, including Canada, are legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits completed or planned: The ILO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

North Atlantic Treaty Organization Civil Administration

Name of Transfer Payment Program: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Civil Administration (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.2: Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to NATO flows from its membership in NATO under the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty. Canada’s contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding the administrative budget of NATO, an international organization vital to Canadian defence and security interests. NATO was designed to promote the stability of the North Atlantic area and to safeguard the freedom and security of its people by political and military means, based on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and international law. NATO accounts are subject to annual audit by the International Board of Auditors (IBAN) for NATO. Since September 1, 2014, and through a voluntary national contribution, Canada has a representative on the IBAN for a four-year period. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions32,602,57327,896,18439,866,75241,169,06636,637,479-3,229,273
Total program32,602,57327,896,18439,866,75241,169,06636,637,479-3,229,273

Comments on variances: Exchange rate fluctuations continue to have a significant impact on the actual spending versus the planned spending. Also, the 2015-16 actual spending was lower than expected due to changes in the timing and size of NATO’s legal settlement payments to the contractor responsible for completing construction of the new NATO Headquarters building in Brussels, Belgium.

Audits completed or planned:

Audits Completed in 2015: The following elements are funded in whole or in part by the NATO Civil Budget and were completed in 2015-16.

Financial and Compliance Audits:

Audits Planned in 2015: The following elements are funded in whole or in part by the NATO Civil Budget and are expected in 2016-17.

Financial and Compliance Audits:

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: March 20, 1975 

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 (amended)

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: The mission of the OECD is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world. The OECD works with governments to understand what drives economic, social and environmental change, measures productivity and global flows of trade and investment, analyzes and compares data to predict future trends, and sets international standards on a wide range of areas, from agriculture and tax to the safety of chemicals.

The OECD’s planning, budgeting and management are all organized on a results-based system. Results are tracked by the Secretariat and are assessed for quality and impact by member countries in the Programme Implementation Report (PIR). The member country assessments in the PIR are further considered by national delegates to OECD committees and by the Secretariat with a view to improving performance in delivering results in the subsequent program of work. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: The OECD continued to address common economic problems, including impacts from the ongoing economic downturn, by pursuing strategies for inclusive growth and jobs and working cooperatively with members on the use of "soft law", guidelines, and agreements.

The OECD members agreed to invite Costa Rica and Lithuania to begin accession processes, launched Country Programs for Peru, Morocco, and Kazakhstan, and intensified cooperation with Ukraine and Southeast Asia. The OECD continued to improve internal governance processes to improve efficiency, effectiveness and transparency by continuing its ongoing in-depth evaluations of OECD work and committees and by agreeing to develop procedures for appointing future secretaries-general.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions10,958,16213,197,71714,144,02614,503,00814,503,008358,982
Total program10,958,16213,197,71714,144,02614,503,00814,503,008358,982

Comments on variances: Planned amounts are based on the previous year’s assessed contribution, increased by a small amount to reflect inflation in France (the OECD is based in Paris), and are calculated in euros. Canada’s share of the budget changes annually, as it is based on a formula that takes into account a country’s three-year average GDP and population statistics. Variances also occur due to exchange rate fluctuations with the euro.

Audits completed or planned: Audits are performed annually by both internal and external auditors, and the reports are reviewed by members through both the Audit Committee and the Budget Committee. For more information, see OECD Internal Audit and Evaluation.

Evaluations completed or planned: Evaluations are performed annually by both internal and external evaluators, and the reports are reviewed by members through both the Evaluation Committee and the Budget Committee. For more information, see OECD Internal Audit and Evaluation.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Organisation internationale de la Francophonie

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organisation International de la Francophonie (OIF) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: March 9, 1972 

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s assessed contribution to the regular budget of the OIF is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of Canada’s membership is to promote Canadian values (cultural and linguistic diversity, democracy, human rights, good governance, etc.) and interests; to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy objectives related to international peace, security, development and prosperity; and to enhance relationships among the 80 La Francophonie member states and governments. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved: Canada was able to access international organizations to contribute to and share responsibility for the management of international issues, as measured by:

Global Affairs Canada does not govern the OIF’s performance management strategy; however, the department receives an annual report (See the OIF's publication web site) and is represented by the Minister of International Development and La Francophonieat the Conférence ministérielle de la Francophonie (CMF), and by the Prime Minister of Canada at Francophonie summits. As well, a number of administrative and financial meetings at the officers’ level and at the level of the Prime Minister’s Personal Representative to La Francophonie are held during the year when such reports are presented.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions14,377,07212,758,34313,780,27215,742,90115,742,9011,962,629
Total program14,377,07212,758,34313,780,27215,742,90115,742,9011,962,629

Comments on variances: The planned spending for 2015-16 represents the amount anticipated to be paid to the OIF in 2015 (the OIF’s fiscal year is the calendar year). The actual spending amount represents the payments made in 2015-16, which consist of the second half of the statutory payment to the OIF for 2015 and the first half of the statutory payment to the OIF for 2016. Another factor explaining the difference between planned and actual spending is the difference in the exchange rate between the moment when the planned amount in euros was calculated in Canadian dollars and when the payments were actually made. In addition, between 2015 and 2018, assessed contributions will rise annually by 1.5 percent. The section of the 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities pertaining to La Francophonie did not factor in these annual increases.

Audits completed or planned: No audits have been conducted or are planned by Global Affairs Canada. The OIF has an external auditor and this individual presents the audit reports every year. The report for 2015 has been released. In 2014-15, Canada assisted the OIF in strengthening the internal audit function. In this context, an audit committee was set up, of which Canada is a member.

Evaluations completed or planned: As part of Global Affairs Canada’s multilateral review exercise, the OIF was examined in 2013-14. An evaluation specific to the results achieved by the OIF between 2009 and 2015 will be carried by Global Affairs Canada in 2016. This evaluation is consistent with the 2009 Treasury Board Policy on Evaluation and with the Financial Administration Act.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In addition to carrying out its programming, the OIF completed in 2016 the simplification of its organizational structure by decreasing the number of its divisions from 13 to 9, with the aim of increasing the impact of its action and to cut spending.

Every year, the Administrator of the OIF presents to the OIF’s members a review of the Organization and of its programming activities. Programming achievements for 2015‑2016 will be presented as part of the OIF’s 2015‑2018 Evaluation.

Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1993

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the OSCE is an obligation arising from its membership in what has become the world’s largest regional security organization, with 57 participating states from North America, Europe, and Eurasia. Canada’s contribution furthers its foreign policy goals related to human rights, fundamental freedoms, fragile states, democratization, conflict prevention, mediation, crisis management, arms control, and post-conflict development. This is achieved by funding capacity-building programs implemented by the OSCE.

Canada’s OSCE contributions also include payments made to administer and implement two legally binding conventional arms control regimes to which Canada is state party, the Treaty on Open Skies (for which Canada is a treaty co-depository, together with Hungary) and the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe, as well as the politically binding Vienna Document.

The OSCE is a primary regional instrument for early warning, conflict prevention, and crisis management and post-conflict rehabilitation. In addition to its security and stability work, it provides a platform for treaty implementation for regional conventional arms control and for confidence- and security-building measures. The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly also provides the political impetus and leadership for spreading democracy norms throughout the region.

The OSCE Unified Budget is approved by the OSCE Permanent Council on a yearly basis and by consensus. It supports the programs and activities of the OSCE Secretariat (in Vienna), its institutions (Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights in Warsaw, High Commissioner on National Minorities in The Hague, and Representative on Freedom of the Media in Vienna), as well as its 16 Field Operations.

The OSCE’s governance mechanisms include internal and external oversight. Namely, the OSCE’s accounts are subject to an annual report by the External Auditor and by an independent Audit Committee, as well as by the OSCE Office of Internal Oversight. All three audit reports are made available to participating States. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions11,869,85811,271,43911,644,71117,792,56317,792,5636,147,852
Total program11,869,85811,271,43911,644,71117,792,56317,792,5636,147,852

Comments on variances: The OSCE budget is assessed in euros and per calendar year. Fluctuations in the exchange rate contributed to the variance between the planned spending and the actual spending. Unused funds are carried over to the new fiscal year budget. The difference of actual spending of approximately $6.1 million for fiscal year 2015-16 is due to the unforeseen establishment of the Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine, for which Canada pays assessed contributions, following the crisis in Ukraine in 2014.

Audits completed or planned: The OSCE’s accounts are subject to an annual report by external auditors, as well as an internal oversight annual report, both of which are made available to participating states. An independent audit committee also provides additional assessment by overseeing the work of both internal and external auditors. For more information, see the OSCE financial report and financial statements for the 2015 calendar year, as reviewed by the External Auditor.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Organization of American States

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization of American States (OAS) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: May 31, 1990

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: The OAS was established in order to achieve among its member states an order of peace and justice, to promote their solidarity, to strengthen their collaboration, and to defend their sovereignty, their territorial integrity, and their independence. The OAS is composed of 35 member states of the Americas and constitutes the main political, juridical, and social governmental forum in the hemisphere. In addition, it has granted permanent observer status to 69 states, as well as to the European Union. The OAS effectively implements its purposes using an approach based on the following four pillars: democracy, human rights, security, and development. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

The Terms and Conditions governing this transfer payment do not specify the performance measures and indicators.

The OAS’s Office of the Inspector General and Board of External Auditors monitor the OAS’s financial, operational and administrative operations and ensure observance and compliance with policies, rules and practices established by the General Secretariat. Reports are produced and approved annually.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions10,392,95710,621,62110,670,44011,959,82211,959,8221,289,382
Total program10,392,95710,621,62110,670,44011,959,82211,959,8221,289,382

Comments on variances: The variance is attributed to Canada’s regular fund quota assessment for the year and to USD exchange rates at the time of payment. Canada’s regular fund quota assessment is 10.53 percent of the OAS regular budget for the 2015 and 2016 calendar years.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Canada maintains a permanent mission to the OAS, headed by an ambassador and permanent representative to the OAS, in Washington, D.C.

Projects and Development Activities Resulting from La Francophonie Summits

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Projects and development activities resulting from La Francophonie summits (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: March 9, 1979

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3 Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: This program provides funding to cooperation programs and activities undertaken by the Organisation international de la Francophonie (OIF) and its Operating Agencies. It also provides financial support to the Government of New Brunswick to foster its participation in summits, ministerial conferences and other related activities related to La Francophonie. This program promotes Canadian interests and is consistent with Canada’s political and economic objectives for La Francophonie. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions8,711,6618,300,0008,000,0008,300,0008,300,000300,000
Total program8,711,6618,300,0008,000,0008,300,0008,300,000300,000

Comments on variances: The amount of planned spending in 2015-16 reflects the amount assigned to this fund in the 2015-16 budget. The increase of $0.3 million in the actual amount spent in 2015-16 is explained by an increase of $0.3 million to the annual contribution made to the Government of New Brunswick (since 2012-13). To date, $6.5 million out of $7.5 million was transferred to the OIF. Before receiving additional funding from Global Affairs Canada, the OIF must provide an interim report, as per the grant arrangement.

Audits completed or planned: No audits have been conducted or are planned by Global Affairs Canada. The OIF has an external auditor; this individual presents audit reports every year. The report for 2015 has been released. In 2014-15, Canada assisted the OIF in strengthening the internal audit function, including setting up an Audit Committee, of which Canada is a member.

Evaluations completed or planned: As part of Global Affairs Canada’s multilateral review exercise, the OIF was examined in 2013-14 and will be examined in 2015-16. An evaluation specific to the results achieved by the OIF between 2009 and 2015 will be carried out by Global Affairs Canada in 2016. This evaluation is consistent with the 2009 Treasury Board Policy on Evaluation and with the Financial Administration Act.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Every year, the Administrator of the OIF presents to the OIF’s members a review of the Organization and of its programming activities. Programming achievements for 2015‑2016 will be presented as part of the OIF’s 2015‑2018 Evaluation.

Religious Freedom Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Religious Freedom Fund Program (RFF) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: 2012-13 

End Date: 2015-16

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2012-13 

Strategic Outcome: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 3.1: International Security and Democratic Development / Sub-Program 3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

Description: The Religious Freedom Fund enhances public space for religious communities so they can benefit from religious freedom; strengthens institutions’ and civil society’s response to specific violations of religious freedom in targeted countries and promote tolerance and pluralism; and, increases effectiveness of organizations, including national and international stakeholders, to act against violations to freedom of religion.

Results Achieved: Religious Freedom Fund programming was effective in meeting its stated objective of enhancing the public space for religious communities by strengthening the alliances and capacities among stakeholders in parliaments and provincial assemblies, and human rights practitioners working specifically on the issue of religious freedom, toward more inclusive governance. For instance, programming in Indonesia focused on increasing interreligious dialogue among minority religious communities and state institutions, increasing the capacity of stakeholders to effectively articulate legislation that protects the interests of religious minorities and their ability to hold governments to account.

Programming further strengthened institutional and civil society response to violations of religious freedom by increasing awareness among relevant groups of tolerance, pluralism and freedom of religion or belief and enhancing the capacity to monitor and remedy situations of abuse or violations by victim and minority groups trained on principles of religious freedom, constitutional rights, advocacy and legal process. In Nigeria, programming has helped build the capacity of civil society to monitor the situation of religious freedom and respond to situations of conflict or abuse between conflicting religious groups. The institution and management of the Tension Management Mechanism provided advice and expertise in relation to the complexities of the issues the communities had to face. Focused interfaith dialogue between the communities enabled the development of joint strategies for resolving issues leading to conflict, as well as strengthened collaboration for intervening during attacks instigated by the Boko Haram insurgent group.

The Program was successful in increasing the effectiveness of organizations, including national and international stakeholders, to act against violations to freedom of religion through capacity building programs, which enabled religious minority communities, civil society groups and activists to effectively monitor and report abuses thereby creating greater awareness of the threats of violations against religious freedom, more accurate documentation of abuses and more timely communication of incidents to the relevant authorities. Through the publication of periodic human rights bulletins, the project drew attention to ongoing abuses and ensured that the concerns of minorities were communicated to an international audience. Subsequent targeted advocacy activities in Washington, D.C., Geneva and Baghdad, ensured relevant information was brought to the attention of both national and international authorities in order to inform their response to the ongoing crisis.

Many of the draconian blasphemy laws and other repressive laws that restrict freedom of religion or belief contribute to the perpetuation of societal attitudes and conflicts, all of which requires a holistic, comprehensive approach and long-term engagement in order to achieve meaningful, sustainable change. Funding authorities for the RFF ended after only three years of operation, and as such the Program was limited in how it was able to measure the sustainability of results over the long term.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants400,000500,000500,00092,88892,888-407,112
Total contributions364,7472,281,4243,750,0005,612,6215,397,8081,647,808
Total program764,7472,781,4244,250,0005,705,5095,490,6961,240,696

Comments on variances: Throughout the noted programming period, the RFF had authority to put in place $500,000 in grant funding; however, only one agreement was ultimately deemed eligible for this type of funding. That project amounted to $100,000 and disbursed only $92,800 as a result of the currency exchange rates over the programming period. The $393,000 difference was re-allocated to the contribution agreement envelope.

In October 2015, additional sum of $1.5 million in contribution funding was authorized for the Office, bringing the total envelope (grants and contributions) up to a total in authorized spending of $5.7 million.

The final financial reconciliation on 19 projects resulted in a 4.5-percent overall lapse in project spending, of which certain amounts had been reallocated to other corporate funding envelopes throughout the fiscal year.

Audits completed or planned: A program audit was completed in February 2016.

Evaluations completed or planned: A program evaluation was completed in October 2015.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: An open Call for Proposals was launched in the summer of 2014, which resulted in over 280 applications being submitted to the Program for potential funding through the Religious Freedom Fund. This exercise helped build the department’s knowledge and network of human rights practitioners able to work on the promotion and protection of freedom of religion or belief, often in closed communities and high-risk environments where the issue of religious freedom is not easy to contend with.

Some of the projects supported through the RFF were a result of smaller scale initiatives funded through the CFLI, which proved successful in assuring sustainable and meaningful results.

When their projects ended, many recipient organizations were invited to debrief policy and geographic experts at Global Affairs Canada to enlighten and inform the department’s strategic engagement on this issue going forward.

Mission representatives, often at the ambassador level, participated in project activities and events in-country, as appropriate. This provided an opportunity for closer engagement with the NGO and beneficiary communities as well as opportunities for direct dialogue and information-sharing with the implementing organizations.

The RFF Program helped identify and strengthen the efforts of a unique subset of human rights defenders whose work focused exclusively on the promotion of freedom of religion or belief and the protection of individuals and minority groups under threat of persecution or discrimination due to religion or belief.

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: UNESCO was founded in 1945, and Canada has been a member since inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to UNESCO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to culture, science and education and provide it with a voice in the international community. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

The Organization’s program and budget, which sets out the strategic objectives and expected outcomes for the Organization’s work, are approved every two years at the UNESCO General Conference. For further information, visit the UNESCO website. Detailed information can be found in UNESCO’s 2015 annual report.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions11,501,37411,692,65712,091,65913,182,41213,182,4121,090,753
Total program11,501,37411,692,65712,091,65913,182,41213,182,4121,090,753

Comments on variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and member states, including Canada, are legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits completed or planned: UNESCO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements. For more information, visit UNESCO's audit and evaluation reports.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

United Nations Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Organization (UN) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The UN was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s assessed contribution to the regular budget of the United Nations is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and provide it with a voice in the international community. Assessed contributions are used to finance the Organization’s programs toward attainment of the UN’s objectives, as set out in its Charter. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

For detailed information, please see the Report of the UN Secretary-General on the work of the Organization.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions89,548,241109,756,252104,896,630117,161,191107,815,8962,919,266
Total program89,548,241109,756,252104,896,630117,161,191107,815,8962,919,266

Comments on variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes and member states, including Canada, are legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits completed or planned: The United Nations Board of Auditors (UNBOA) was established in 1946. For more than 70 years, the heads of the Supreme Audit Institutions from the UN Member States have provided independent, professional and quality audit services. The current UNBOA members are Germany, India, and Tanzania. For more information, please see the UN Board of Auditors’ Reports.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Peacekeeping Operations (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The UN was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: United Nations peacekeeping operations help countries torn by conflict create the conditions for lasting peace. In addition to maintaining peace and security, peacekeepers are increasingly charged with assisting in political processes, reforming judicial systems, training law enforcement and police forces, disarming and reintegrating former combatants, and supporting the return of internally displaced persons and refugees. Canada’s assessed contribution to UN peacekeeping operations is a legally binding obligation of membership. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions213,618,115271,004,489267,121,802332,629,204323,932,30456,810,502
Total program213,618,115271,004,489267,121,802332,629,204323,932,30456,810,502

Comments on variances: The assessed budgets for UN peacekeeping operations are negotiated outcomes of the UN Fifth Committee, and member states, including Canada, are legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. The creation of new missions and unexpected crisis situations can significantly alter the budgets. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits completed or planned: The audit examination conducted by the UN Board of Auditors included UN Headquarters, 15 active field missions, 31 completed missions, and the four special-purpose accounts, namely, the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, the support account for peacekeeping operations, the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi and the Employee Benefits Funds. For more information, please see the UN Board of Auditors’ Reports.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

World Health Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Health Organization (WHO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The WHO was established in 1948, and Canada has been a member since inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2011-12 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the WHO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to health and provide it with a voice in the international community. For further information, please visit the WHO website. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results Achieved:

The WHO’s Programme Budget, which sets out the strategic objectives and expected outcomes for the Organization’s work, is approved every two years by the World Health Assembly. For more information, please visit:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions15,071,09715,501,96315,758,11617,853,72317,853,7232,095,607
Total program15,071,09715,501,96315,758,11617,853,72317,853,7232,095,607

Comments on variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and member states, including Canada, are legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits completed or planned: The WHO has an External Auditor and provides regular audited financial reports.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

World Trade Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Trade Organization (WTO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1995 

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2009-10

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Links to the organization’s programs: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements / Sub-Program 1.2.3: Assessed Contributions to International Organizations

Description: The purpose of this program is to pay the assessed contribution for Canada's membership in the WTO. The WTO provides a common set of rules, rights and obligations for the trade policies of its 164 members and a forum for Canada to advance its trade interests on the broadest possible basis. The WTO provides Canada with the opportunity to build alliances, influence rules and secure concessions on issues where it would otherwise have less leverage. Several such issues, including agriculture subsidies and various regulatory issues (e.g. sanitary and phytosanitary measures) are more effectively addressed multilaterally. The WTO also has a robust dispute settlement system, of which Canada is a regular user. Through the ongoing work of its many committees, the WTO provides a forum for Canada to raise and resolve a range of trade irritants and market access issues. Finally, WTO is also an active forum for trade policy monitoring and surveillance.

The Doha Development Agenda (DDA), launched in 2001, was a comprehensive negotiation agenda covering the core areas of agriculture, market access for non-agricultural goods (NAMA) and services, as well as issues such as development, trade facilitation, intellectual property, rules (trade remedies and subsidy disciplines), trade and the environment, and dispute settlement. Canada continues to have important commercial interests in all negotiating areas, including, most notably, in agriculture, NAMA and services.

Results Achieved:

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total contributions6,336,2406,020,0766,459,3797,198,8677,198,867739,488
Total program6,336,2406,020,0766,459,3797,198,8677,198,867739,488

Comments on variances: Canada's contribution to the WTO budget is based on its share of world trade and is calculated and paid in Swiss francs. Planned spending was based on the best information available at the time. The actual spending represents the precise amount of the contribution that was calculated in late 2014 and converted into Canadian dollars at the time payment was made. The variance can be accounted for by the large fluctuation of the exchange rate between the period when the estimate is prepared and the payment is disbursed.

Audits completed or planned: The WTO is subject to an audit by external auditors every year. As a member of the WTO, Canada also has access to all audits, evaluations and performance reviews completed by or on behalf of the WTO. During the 2015-16 fiscal year, an external audit was completed by Bundesrechnungshof, the Supreme Audit Institution of Germany. The external auditor certified that the WTO’s financial statements accurately reflected the financial position of the WTO as of December 31, 2015.

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Horizontal Initiatives – Global Peace and Security Fund

Name of horizontal initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of lead department(s): Global Affairs Canada

Federal partner organization(s):

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s): GPSF supported 46 partners (United Nations agencies and NGOs).

Start date of the horizontal initiative:

End date of the horizontal initiative: March 31, 2019.

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars): $1.23 billion

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars): N/A

Description of the horizontal initiative: To advance the peace and security priorities of the Government of Canada, the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) leads Canadian government engagement in complex political-security crises in fragile and conflict-affected states. START also coordinates whole-of-government responses to crises, including natural disasters. Managed by START, the Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF) is the funding envelope for international assistance programming in these areas. The GPSF also funds START policy analysis and planning, coordination activities and program management, and deployments for international election observation, police and civilian missions delivered by Global Affairs Canada and other government departments and agencies, such as DND and the RCMP.

The GPSF programming provides timely, coherent, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges that implicate Canadian interests and reflect Canadian foreign policy priorities, including in states such as Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq and Ukraine. GPSF programming includes both transfer and non-transfer payments. Non-transfer payment programming enables Global Affairs Canada to work closely with other federal departments to provide beneficiary states and civilian components of multilateral peace operations with critical expertise in the areas of security and justice system reform. START/GPSF is sourced from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Shared outcome(s): The ultimate shared outcome is peace, security and the safety and well-being of those living in priority fragile or conflict-affected states, through effective stabilization and reconstruction programming. Specific expected results are:

Governance structures: The GPSF is managed by START. To ensure policy coherence and avoid duplication, various interdepartmental and intradepartmental committees are called upon, as required, to inform and guide emerging priority-setting exercises and implement Cabinet-mandated priorities in the whole-of-government context. The START staff work within the International Security Branch of Global Affairs Canada, which is responsible for START’s financial, human and physical resources. START’s Advisory Board comprises representatives from within Global Affairs Canada as well as from other departments and agencies. The objective of the board is to provide a forum for consultation and exchange when it comes to whole-of-government strategic policy, priority-setting and direction on fragile states and complex emergencies, within the framework of individual departmental authorities.

Performance highlights: See Performance Information by Federal Organization sections below.

Results achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners: In 2015-16, GPSF supported 69 partners in 54 countries. Top sectors were security system management and reform ($44.6 million; 19 projects); human rights ($11.07 million, 17 projects); civilian peace-building and conflict prevention and resolution ($7.4 million, nine projects); landmine clearance ($7.05 million, 11 projects); and democratic participation and civil society ($3.6 million, 13 projects). For more information about the results, please consult Section 3.1 of the Departmental Performance Report.

Contact information:

Larisa Galadza
Director General, Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs), formerly known as the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START)
125 Sussex Ave., Ottawa (Ontario) K1A 0G2
Tel.: 343‑203-2825
Email: Larisa.Galadza@international.gc.ca

Performance Information by Federal Organization – Global Affairs Canada

Link to organization’s program(s):

Contributing programs and activities: Global Peace and Security Program

Total allocation (from start to end date): $1.23 billion

2015-16 Planned spending: $106.9 million

2015-16 Actual spending: $103.69 million

Expected Results:

Actual results against targets: Through START, Global Affairs Canada supported 92 government institutions and civil society organizations in fragile and conflict-affected states.

Mentorship, training, and support was delivered to local police authorities in Haiti, the West Bank, and Ukraine to improve stability and security through Canadian Police Arrangement of up to 95 Canadian police officers.

International community better equipped to respond to and address allegations of international crimes against humanity, including sexual and gender-based crimes, through the expanding work of Justice Rapid Response, an international standby roster of rapidly deployable criminal justice experts, supported by the deployment of a Canadian expert as the organization’s Executive Director.

Enhanced capacity of the Ukrainian military to defend and secure Ukraine and its citizens through the provision of training assistance and non-lethal equipment for Ukrainian security forces.

Through START, working in partnership with representatives of the Government of Iraq and the Iraqi Yazidi community, Canada supported the establishment of community dialogue mechanisms to facilitate the safe return and reintegration of displaced Yazidi populations, and their inclusion in decision-making processes.

Training and technical support provided to enable previously excluded representatives of the Syrian opposition party to participate in the Syria peace talks, ensuring the representation of their constituencies at the negotiation table.

Effective whole-of-government, civilian-led coordination of Canada’s response to the April 2015 earthquake in Nepal, which resulted in deployment of DND’s Disaster Assistance Response Team within eight days of the disaster, the deployment of emergency stockpiles, and the donation of $51.7 million in humanitarian assistance.

Performance Information by Federal Organization – DND and the Canadian Armed Forces

Link to organization’s program(s): 3.1.1 International Security and Threat Reduction

Contributing programs and activities: The Global Peace Operations Program

Total allocation (from start to end date): N/A

2015-16 Planned spending: $0.0

2015-16 Actual spending: $8.89 million

2015-16 Expected Results: Strengthened institutions in affected states.

2015-16 Actual results against targets: The Ukrainian armed forces received training in a variety of competencies, which ranged from basic combat arms skills (including non-lethal training funded by Global Affairs Canada) to flight safety procedures. In total, 571 Ukrainian soldiers have been trained, including 230 in combat first aid and 55 Ukrainian instructors to generate a train-the-trainer capacity.

Ukrainian military capability and professionalism was enhanced with Ukrainian armed forces leading, developing, delivering and monitoring all military training across identified lines of effort in Ukraine with minimal Canadian augmentation.

Performance Information by Federal Organization – Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Link to organization’s program(s):

Contributing programs and activities:

Performance Information by Federal Organization – Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC)

Link to organization’s program(s): 3.1.1 International Security and Threat Reduction

Contributing programs and activities: Delivery of International Assistance under the CCC/Global Affairs Canada Memorandum of Understanding

Total allocation (from start to end date): $0.0

2015-16 Planned spending: $0.0

2015-16 Actual spending: $0.07 million

2015-16 Expected Results: Strengthened institutions in affected states.

2015-16 Actual results against targets: 200 BlackBerry phones provided and 54 were activated. Training and support were difficult due to the instability in the region and the difficulty of providing support remotely.

Performance Information by Federal Organization – Correctional Service Canada

Link to organization’s program(s): 3.1.1 International Security and Threat Reduction

Contributing programs and activities: Stabilization and reconstruction in Haiti

Total allocation (from start to end date): $0.0

2015-16 Planned spending: $0.0

2015-16 Actual spending: $0.31 million

2015-16 Expected Results: Strengthened institutions in affected states.

2015-16 Actual results against targets: Haitian correction officers were trained and supported to ensure that emergency plans were tailored to each institution. Training on the new emergency manual was delivered to all regional deputy directors, institutional heads and operational chiefs, as well as to the correctional teams based in each region. From a health standpoint, at the request of the penitentiary administration, a comprehensive plan was developed to create a Medical Directorate Sector accountable for its results. This is a large-scale plan whose objective is growth in internal management capacity and improved quality of care.

Total for all federal organizations

Total allocation (from start to end date): $1.23 billion

2015-16 Planned spending: $118.3 million

2015-16 Actual spending: $113.6 million

2015-16 Expected Results: N/A

2015-16 Actual results against targets: N/A

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits Completed in 2015-16
Title of Internal AuditInternal Audit TypeCompletion Date
Colombia Development ProgramAssurance engagementMay 2015
Canada-Based Staff OvertimeAssurance engagementAugust 2015
Bilateral Development Program in MaliAssurance engagementAugust 2015
Administration of the Foreign Service DirectivesAssurance engagementJanuary 2016
Specified Procedures on the Departmental Financial Statements Fiscal Year 2014‑2015Assurance engagementJanuary 2016
Management of Staff Rotation and MobilityAssurance engagementFebruary 2016
Fraud Management FrameworkReviewMarch 2016

To read the available reports, please consult Internal Audits.

Internal Evaluations in Progress or Completed in 2015–16
Title of the EvaluationStatusDeputy Head Approval DateLink to department’s PAA
Sector PracticesCompletedMay 2015

2.1.1: International Business Development Through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad

2.1.2: Foreign Direct Investment in Canada

2.1.3: International Innovation, Science and Technology

Canada’s Northern Foreign PolicyCompletedDecember 20151.2.2: Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy
Canadian Technology AcceleratorCompletedDecember 20152.1.1: International Business Development Through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad
Client Service FundCompletedDecember 20152.1.1: International Business Development through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad
Global Peace and Security Fund/Stabilization and Reconstruction Task ForceCompletedDecember 20153.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction
Formative Evaluation of Canada’s Contribution to the Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (MNCH) InitiativeCompletedJanuary 20163.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health
Ghana and Ethiopia Cluster Country Program EvaluationCompletedJanuary 2016

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health

Indonesia Country Program EvaluationCompletedJanuary 2016

3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

West Bank/Gaza Program EvaluationCompletedJanuary 2016

3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.3: Food Security

3.3.1: Humanitarian Programming

Bangladesh Country ProgramCompletedMarch 2016

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

Development Partner Countries/formerly Countries of Modest Presence (Asia, Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean)CompletedMarch 2016

3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

3.2.3: Food Security

Tanzania and Mozambique Cluster Country Program EvaluationCompletedMarch 2016

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health

United Nations Population Fund ReviewCompletedMarch 20163.2.4: Multisector Assistance, Social Development, and Development Engagement
Office of Religious FreedomCompletedMay 2016

1.2.1: Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy

1.2.2: Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy

Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program and Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building ProgramCompletedMay 20163.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction
Canadian Foreign Service InstituteCompletedMay 20165.0 Internal Services
Canadian Fund for Local InitiativesCompletedMay 20161.2.1: Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy
Global Partnership ProgramCompletedMay 20163.1.1: International Security and Threat Reduction
Mission Security and Personal SafetyIn ProgressSeptember 20164.1.3: Security
Partners for Development ProgramIn ProgressSeptember 2016

3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.2: Children and Youth, Including Maternal Newborn and Child Health

3.2.3: Food Security

South Sudan Country Program EvaluationIn ProgressMarch 2017

3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health

Organisation internationale de la Francophonie reviewIn ProgressJune 20171.2.2: Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy
Vietnam Country Program EvaluationIn ProgressSeptember 2017

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.3: Food Security

Development Partner Countries/formerly Countries of Modest Presence (Africa)In ProgressDecember 2017

3.1.2: Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

3.2.1: Sustainable Economic Growth

3.2.2: Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

3.2.3: Food Security

To read the full reports, please consult Evaluation Reports.

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees

The Department led the preparation of two government responses tabled in Parliament to address parliamentary committee reports during fiscal year 2015-16. Both of these government responses were tabled by the previous government during the 41st Parliament.

  1. House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development (FAAE): Report Seven: “Overcoming Violence and Impunity: Human Rights Challenges in Honduras” (Prepared by the FAAE’s Subcommittee on International Human Rights (SDIR); Adopted by the FAAE on March 19, 2015; Presented to the House on March 30, 2015).

    • The report, which draws on evidence heard by the Subcommittee during both the first and second sessions of the 41st Parliament in connection with the human rights situation facing targeted groups in Honduras, makes twelve recommendations across five broad areas: diplomatic interventions with the Government of Honduras to encourage greater vigilance in various areas; diplomatic support to human rights defenders under threat; monitoring of the Honduran government’s implementation of the precautionary measures associated with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights’ (IACHR); continuing development assistance and security programming that improves citizen security and respect for human rights; and trade and corporate social responsibility. During its study, the Subcommittee heard evidence concerning a range of factors that have contributed to a lack of respect for human rights in Honduras; the report acknowledges the complexity of the situation facing Honduras as it attempts to re-build its democratic institutions in the wake of the 2009 coup, which left its population deeply polarized.
    • The Canadian government’s response agrees with all twelve recommendations, noting they were broadly consistent with policies and programs already underway within the current scope of Canadian government activities, and confirms the report reflects a balanced and realistic assessment of the situation in Honduras.
    • To read the full report and the Government of Canada response, please consult: Report Seven – Overcoming Violence and Impunity: Human Rights Challenges in Honduras and the Government Response.
  2. House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development (FAAE): Report Eight: Canada’s Response to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) (Adopted by the FAAE on March 24, 2015; presented to the House on March 30, 2015).

    • The report, which draws on evidence heard by the Committee from September 2014 to February 2015, puts forward 16 recommendations concerning the government’s approach to addressing the ISIL-generated crisis, including with regard to its continued participation in the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL; disruption of ISIL’s terrorist financing; countering of ISIL’s extremist ideology; documentation of human rights violations; capacity-building support to the Iraqi government; humanitarian assistance, particularly in response to international appeals and support directed toward vulnerable groups such as religious and ethnic minorities, women and girls and children and youth; support to the Syrian-led political peace process; work on religious freedom, and development of a long-term strategy for Canada’s engagement in the Middle East and North Africa. A supplementary report from the New Democratic Party is also appended to the report.
    • During its study, the Committee heard evidence concerning the crisis from a range of stakeholders, including twice from the former ministers of Foreign Affairs and National Defence, accompanied by departmental officials. The report summarizes the circumstances that led to ISIL’s rise in Syria and Iraq and the ensuing consequences and discusses the response to ISIL from both international and Canadian perspectives. It then considers the strategic context of the crisis, measures to bring about ISIL’s defeat, and the need to support good governance and religious freedom in the broader Middle East before issuing recommendations.
    • The government’s response agrees with all but one of the recommendations. It takes note of Recommendation 13 to develop a long-term strategy to guide its engagement in the Middle East and North Africa but emphasizes its employment of a number of existing mechanisms to advance long-term strategic goals while maintaining sufficient flexibility to respond to the fluidity of the political and security challenges facing many of the countries in the region.
    • To read the full report and government response, please consult: Report Eight – Canada’s Response to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and the Government Response (presented to the House on July 22, 2015).

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

  1. Fall 2015 Report of the Auditor General of Canada: Report 2 – Controlling Exports at the Border

    • This audit focused on whether the Canada Border Services Agency (the Agency) and its key federal partners (including Global Affairs Canada) had the necessary information, practices, and controls at the border to enable the Agency to implement its enforcement priorities, prevent the export of goods that contravened Canada’s export laws, and facilitate legitimate trade. There were no recommendations received for Global Affairs Canada. To read the full report and the Agency’s response, please consult Report 2 – Controlling Exports at the Border.

External audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

N/A

Up Front Multi-year Funding – CIGI

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Link to department’s PAA: Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements

Name of recipient: Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

Start date: January 30, 2003

End date: Ongoing

Description: CIGI supports world-leading research in the area of global governance, particularly in the areas of global economy, global security and politics, and international law. CIGI furthers Canada’s interests in a stable and well-governed global system by bringing together academics, policy analysts and researchers from around the world to discuss and carry out research on current topics and trends. In 2003, the Government of Canada contributed $30 million, which was matched by CIGI and private donors, to establish an endowment fund. The Centre continues to be funded by the proceeds of this endowment and other draw-down sources of revenue from the Government of Ontario and private donors.

Comments on variances: N/A

Significant audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan: CIGI publishes an annual report of its activities that includes financial statements.

Significant evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan: CIGI continued its work responding to the recommendations made in the 2013 Federal Evaluation. This included exploring ways to increase research capacity through better utilization of existing resources and the addition of new positions. To this end, CIGI’s International Law Research Program (ILRP) developed three new Deputy Director positions for the following areas: (i) Intellectual Property Law, (ii) Environment Law and (iii) Economic Law. In addition, a Senior Research Fellow category has been created to retain the best young researchers. Interdisciplinary research and collaboration has also increased, focusing on issues related to sovereign debt, Internet governance and climate change.

CIGI senior managers continue to improve collaboration among staff by holding regular program meetings with members from the research, communications and event divisions. The program team also held a retreat for both resident and non-resident Fellows to meet and discuss a wide range of CIGI programming areas.

A list of projects is now developed and reviewed annually by CIGI Senior Management with a view to ensuring adherence to mandate and ensuring that programmatic priorities reflect both emerging trends in global governance as well as policy areas where research can have an impact. As a result of these discussions, a complete list of projects is prepared (referred to internally as the Program of Work & Budget or “PWB”). The PWB contains details on projects, work plans and their associated budgets for each department within CIGI (research, public affairs, human resources and operations). This document is then brought to the CIGI Board of Directors for approval.

CIGI remains committed to conducting periodic internal reviews of major activities, as emphasized in the CIGI Strategic Plan (2015‑20). As part of this commitment, an evaluation of G20 activities was undertaken by an external evaluator based in Ottawa (Goss Gilroy Inc.). The findings of this report concluded, inter alia, that:

  1. CIGI’s work on the G20 is well-regarded by stakeholders and making important policy contributions.
  2. The program demonstrated significant early achievements, followed by some years of drift, and the current period of renewed focus and increasing credibility.
  3. Activities are highly tied to CIGI’s legacy in supporting the G20, which allows for impressive access, but also presents an unstated objective to defend the G20 and potential tension for the program.

While CIGI works to respond to the recommendations provided in the report, the approach used for this particular evaluation will be internalized for future monitoring and evaluation exercises.

Once CIGI moved into its new building, it undertook a number of initiatives to ensure that its facilities were optimally used. These initiatives included (i) providing students from the Balsillie School of International Affairs (BSIA) with access to CIGI’s library and research assistance, as well as hosting (ii) the CIGI Speaker Series and (iii) the CIGI Cinema Series. The CIGI Speaker Series takes place every year between September and May and features 16 to 20 lectures. Open to the general public, these lectures deal with a range of important international topics in an effort to raise public awareness and understanding on a variety of current global issues. The Speaker Series features some of the most prominent and acclaimed figures in their respective areas of global governance. The CIGI Cinema Series is delivered free of charge and is open to the public. Each year, films (cinematic and documentary) are selected that touch upon key areas of policy discussion and research relevant to CIGI’s mandate. Occasionally these screenings are paired with relevant lectures or commentary from CIGI experts or individuals involved in making the film.

CIGI continues to support young scholars and ideas with respect to the global governance agenda. For instance, the CIGI Junior Fellow program has provided both financial and technical support to a group of graduate students at the BSIA to undertake a forecasting exercise for Global Affairs Canada. Presentations and briefings were given to Global Affairs Canada officials on June 10, 2016. Additionally, CIGI has provided 26 students with scholarships for advanced studies in international law at the Master of Laws and doctor of judicial science level for the 2015‑2016 period. Each scholarship included a period of residency at the CIGI Campus. The ILRP also has five post-doctoral Fellows who have completed their PhD studies and are continuing their research in such areas as economic, environmental and intellectual property law.

Summary of results achieved by the recipient:

CIGI research continued to focus on the following topics by research area:

CIGI experts delivered a range of briefings to Ministers, Deputy Ministers, ADMs, Directors and other senior staff at Global Affairs Canada (including the Cyber Team, Foreign Policy Team, Middle East and Maghreb Bureau, etc.); Environment and Climate Change Canada; National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces; Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada; Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Transport Canada; and Indigenous and North Affairs Canada. In addition, a number of former Canadian prime ministers and ambassadors also received briefings.

Performance Information (dollars)
2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used)Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
0.00.00.00.00.00.0

User Fees – Access to Information

Fee name: Access to Information Act (ATIA) fees

Fee type: Other products and services (O)

Fee-setting authority: Section 11 of the Access to Information Act (ATIA) and section 7 of the Access to Information Regulations.

Year introduced: 1983

Year last amended: 1992 

Performance standards: Response provided within 30 days following receipt of a request; the response time may be extended under section 9 of the Access to Information Act.

Performance results: Statutory deadlines were met 71 percent of the time; and 36 percent of requests were completed within a 30-day period.

Other information: Estimated full cost is based on projected staffing of up to 63 full-time employees.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull cost
10,0005,4007,301,506
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
2016-1710,0005,876,000
2017-1810,0005,876,000
2018-1910,0005,876,000

User Fees – Consular Services

Fee name: Consular Services Fee

Fee type: Other products and services (O)

Fee-setting authority: Consular Service Fee Regulations pursuant to the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Act.

Year introduced: 1995 

Year last amended: 1995 

Performance standard:

Consular Services performance standards are grouped under the following service standards categories:

  1. Protection and Assistance
  2. Contact with Prisoners
  3. Passports and Citizenship
  4. Information—Canada/Third Countries
  5. Information—Local
  6. Legal and Notary

For more information, please consult the Service standards website

Consular services are provided to Canadians 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at more than 260 points of service around the world. Outside regular business hours, calls are forwarded to the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa. Emergency situations are dealt with immediately.

Consular Services provided to Canadians are detailed in the Canadian Consular Services Charter and assessed based on written service standards (established in 1995) with qualitative and quantitative indicators. The service standards are available at Consular services: Service Standards as well as at all missions abroad, where they are either in public view or can be provided by employees.

Every effort is made to obtain solutions for specific problems and to provide the required service. However, the department's ability to do so and its success are conditioned, in many instances, by the laws and regulations of other countries as well as the quality and level of cooperation offered by persons and organizations outside the Government of Canada.

Performance results: Of the 3,576 Canadians who completed a Client Feedback Form in 2015-16, 94 percent reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the services received. The department also reports on performance against passport, citizenship and arrest/detention service standards. This information for 2015-16 is noted below.

Canada’s missions abroad are asked to make regular contact with long-term Canadian detainees. The frequency of contact reflects local conditions: once every three months (e.g. in much of Latin America, Africa and Asia), once every six months (e.g. in much of Western Europe) or once every 12 months (e.g. in the United States, where over two-thirds of these detainees are located). As of March 31, 2016, missions met this standard 96 percent of the time.

Missions are asked to report on their ability to accept, review and forward citizenship applications to Canada within the 10-day service standard. During 2015-16, they did so successfully with 90 percent of the applications. Missions are monitored for their ability to meet the 20-day service standard for passport issuance. They met this standard 90 percent of the time.

Other information: N/A

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull cost
106,016,61396,381,859137,037,292
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
2016-1797,061,450139,291,555
2017-1898,043,750141,582,902
2018-1953,281,075143,911,940

Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

External Fee Name: Consular Services Fee

Service standard: Consular services are based on written service standards (established in 1995), which detail the services to be provided, along with qualitative and quantitative standards to be used by employees. The service standards are available at Consular services: Service Standards as well as at all missions abroad, where they are either in public view or can be provided by employees.

Consular services are provided to Canadians 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at more than 260 points of service around the world. Outside regular business hours, calls are forwarded to the Emergency Operations Centre in Ottawa. Emergency situations are dealt with immediately.

Performance results: See above performance results.

Stakeholder consultation in 2015-16 or prior fiscal years: In 2015-16, Time & Motion studies on both the delivery of the Passport and the Citizenship programs abroad was conducted. We are currently reviewing results and discussing how these results will be reflected.

Other Information: N/A

Export/Import Permit Fees

Fee name: Fees for the issuance of export and import certificates and permits

Fee type: Other products and services (O)

Fee-setting authority: Export and Import Permits Act and Export and Import Permits and Certificates Fees Order.

Year introduced: 1995

Year last amended: 1995

Performance standard: Deliver non-strategic, non-routed import and export permits within 15 minutes of the time of application; process within four business hours permit applications that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers or that have been flagged for an officer’s review by the applicant when no additional information or documentation is required; process within three business days permit applications for BC Logs that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers; process within five business days permit applications for firearms that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers; process applications for permits to export-controlled military and strategic goods and technology from eligible exporters who have provided all required supporting documentation within 10 working days where consultation outside the Bureau is not required and 40 business days where consultation is required.

Performance results: A greater than 97-percent success rate on the processing of 330,221 permit applications, surpassing the service standard of 95 percent.

Other information: N/A

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull cost
2,400,0003,215,6727,050,342
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
2016-172,400,0007,100,000
2017-182,400,0007,100,000
2018-192,400,0007,100,000

Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

External Fee name: Fees for the issuance of export and import certificates and permits

Service standard: Deliver non-strategic, non-routed import and export permits within 15 minutes of the time of application; process within four business hours permit applications that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers or that have been flagged for an officer’s review by the applicant when no additional information or documentation is required.

Performance results: See above performance results.

Stakeholder consultation in 2015-16 or prior fiscal years: The department’s consultative bodies provide ongoing input from stakeholders with respect to certain trade controls, as well as regular outreach and specific consultations with associations and companies with respect to export and import controls. Fees have not changed since 1995 and therefore have not required fee-specific consultations.

Other Information: N/A

User Fees – Specialized Consular Services

Fee name: Specialized Consular Services Fee

Fee type: Other products and services (O)

Fee-setting authority: Consular Fee (Specialized Services) Regulations, pursuant to paragraph 19 (1)(a) of the Financial Administration Act.

Year introduced: N/A

Year last amended: 2010

Performance standard:

Specialized Consular Services performance standards are grouped under the following service standards categories:

  1. Protection and Assistance
  2. Legal and Notary

The complete list of service standards is available on Global Affairs Canada’s website and at all Canadian missions abroad. Clients are invited to comment if they did not receive the level of service they expected or if they wish to make suggestions.

Performance results: 90 percent of 136 clients reported overall satisfaction with the legal and notary services they received.

Other information: N/A

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull cost
3,226,2612,418,7343,771,770
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
2016-172,982,0133,833,816
2017-182,982,0133,896,882
2018-192,982,0133,960,986

Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

External Fee name: Specialized Consular Services Fee

Service standard: These standards are available at Consular services: Service Standards and at all Canadian missions abroad. Clients are invited to comment if they did not receive the level of service they expected or if they wish to make suggestions.

Performance results: See above performance results.

Stakeholder consultation in 2015-16 or prior fiscal years: The consular service standards were developed in 1995 following consultations with Canadians at some 80 missions abroad and with selected clients in Canada. Surveys were also conducted at the international airports in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver.

Other Information: N/A

User Fees Reporting Totals

User Fees Reporting Totals Table
 2015-16 (dollars)Planning years (dollars)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
Sub-total: Other Products and Services (Access to Information and Privacy; Import/Export; Consular and Specialized Consular Services)111,652,874102,021,665155,160,9102016-17102,453,463156,101,371
2017-18103,435,763158,455,784
2018-1958,673,088160,848,926
Total111,652,874102,021,665155,160,9102016-17102,453,463156,101,371
2017-18103,435,763158,455,784
2018-1958,673,088160,848,926
Date Modified: