Departmental Results Report 2016-17

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Government of Canada Catalogue Number: FR2-25E-PDF
International Standard Serial Number (ISSN): 2561-2182

Table of contents

Ministers’ Message

The Honourable Chrystia Freeland
The Honourable Chrystia Freeland
Minister of Foreign Affairs
The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau
The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau
Minister of International Development and
La Francophonie
The Honourable François-Philippe Champagne
The Honourable
François-Philippe Champagne
Minister of International Trade

At a time when the universal values and standards that have shaped the international community for more than 70 years are increasingly under pressure, Canada is helping support the rules-based international order that benefits the world’s people, including Canadians.

By seeking an active leadership role in multilateral forums such as the United Nations, the G7, the G20, the Organization of American States, the World Trade Organization, the World Health Organization, the Commonwealth, La Francophonie, and North Atlantic Treaty Organization, we are demonstrating to the world not only do Canadians value peace, security, sustainable development and prosperity; we are prepared to commit the time and resources needed to maintain and advance our values.

As a trading nation, we draw upon the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement as we seek to intensify and diversify Canadian trade worldwide, including in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa and Asia. Economic prosperity depends on trade, and CETA is an agreement that should serve as a model for renewed and improved trade relations across the globe. As more of the world’s people insist that the global financial system is working against them, we must commit ourselves to ensuring that the benefits of trade extend to the middle class, not just the wealthiest few. With its strong provisions in areas such as labour and environmental protection, CETA will deliver economic opportunities for all Canadians. Canada will continue to push for better standards that put people, especially women, young entrepreneurs, and Indigenous peoples, and gender equality front and centre. Canada was the first G20 country to include a gender chapter within a trade agreement and we will continue to push for an expansion of opportunity, equality, and prosperity for the middle class.

In a similar way, Canada’s new Feminist International Assistance Policy recognizes that a more inclusive, peaceful and prosperous world is achievable when the best interests of all citizens are considered, and when all citizens can have a say in the policies that affect them. We must strongly defend the rights of the most vulnerable, particularly those who experience discrimination and exclusion. By ensuring that women and girls are empowered to reach their full potential, we create conditions that allow them to better contribute to the development of their families and communities, and ultimately, to the health and stability of both. Through our inclusive approach, we also target all forms of discrimination and marginalization, including those based on gender, race, ethnicity, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, ability, or migrant or refugee status.

We recognize that credibility on the global stage goes to those who practice what they preach. Canadians value an open and inclusive society, welcome immigration, believe in progressive trade, strive to protect the environment, and at every opportunity we promote democracy and stand up for human rights. Canada has shown a powerful commitment to multiculturalism and diversity – and we must continue to do so. Canada’s foreign policy must reflect our core national value: diversity is our strength.

Looking ahead, as we assume the G7 presidency in 2018, we will have an opportunity to show real leadership on important global challenges, including protectionism, rising nationalism and xenophobia, climate change, mass migration, inequality and regional instability.

Canada is eager to work within the multilateral system and with other like-minded people and countries that share our aims. Together, we can navigate and rise above the complexities of today’s world.

Results at a Glance

Departmental Spending by Strategic Outcome

Departmental Spending by Strategic Outcome
Text Alternative

Departmental Spending by Strategic Outcome

  • SO1: $980,932,658
  • SO2: $242,649,328
  • SO3: $3,871,235,855
  • SO4: $931,402,810
  • Internal Services: $233,804,155
  • Actual spending for 2016-17: $6,260,024,806

Full Time Equivalents by Strategic Outcome

Full time Equivalents by Strategic Outcome Graphic
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Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) by Strategic Outcome

  • SO1: 1,382
  • SO2: 1,757
  • SO3: 1,074
  • SO4: 4,344
  • Internal Services: 1,382
  • Actual FTEs for 2016-17: 11,003

SO 1 - Canada’s International Agenda

SO 2 - International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians

SO 3 - International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation

SO 4 - Canada’s Network Abroad

For more information on the department’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Raison d’être, Mandate and Role: Who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

Global Affairs Canada, under the leadership of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of International Trade and the Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, is responsible for conducting Canada’s international relations, including foreign affairs, international trade and commerce, international development and humanitarian assistance, consular services for Canadians, and the Government of Canada’s global network of missions abroad.

Mandate and Role

Global Affairs Canada manages Canada’s diplomatic and consular relations with foreign governments and international organizations, engaging and influencing international players to advance Canada’s political and economic interests and to promote a rules-based international system, inclusive and accountable governance, peaceful pluralism, respect for diversity, environmental sustainability, gender equality, the empowerment of women and girls, women’s rights and human rights.

Global Affairs Canada also manages Canada’s international platform — a global network of 178 missions in 110 countries that supports the international work of the department and 37 partner departments, agencies and co-locators.

To improve and maintain market access for Canadian businesses, the department leads the negotiation of bilateral, plurilateral and multilateral trade agreements, the administration of export and import controls, as well as the management of international trade disputes. Global Affairs Canada also provides advice and services to help Canadian businesses succeed abroad and attract foreign direct investment to Canada, and supports international innovation, science and technology.

The department delivers consular services and provides travel information to Canadians. It also supports global peace and stability and addresses international security threats such as terrorism, transnational organized crime and the proliferation of weapons and materials of mass destruction.

To reduce global poverty and enhance prosperity and stability in the developing world, the department manages the majority of Canada’s international assistance to deliver effective and sustainable development programming. The department also leads coordinated Canadian responses to crises and natural disasters abroad, including the provision of humanitarian assistance.

Global Affairs Canada develops and implements policy and programming based on analysis of available evidence, including through consultation and engagement with Canadians and its international stakeholders. The department is responsible for fostering the development of international law and its applications in Canada’s foreign relations.

The department’s legal responsibilities are detailed in the 2013 Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development ActFootnote i.

For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report. For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Ministers’ mandate letters on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website.Footnote ii

Operating Context and Key Risks

Operating Context

This year, the department worked to advance Canada’s interests internationally in an increasingly dynamic and unpredictable global environment with emerging global players.

External:

Geopolitically, international relations now include non-government actors, such as multinational corporations and non-governmental organizations. Within this dynamic world, Canada can play a more prominent role fostered through robust bilateral and multilateral engagement. Canada is also well positioned to partner with non-government actors to confront global challenges.

Nine years after the global financial crisis, progress toward economic recovery has been slow and characterized by market volatility. Slow economic growth and income inequality have a direct or indirect impact on political stability and poverty alleviation efforts—in turn providing fertile ground for exclusion, social instability, and extremism. As evidenced by recent international events, cyber threats continue to increase and will likely become more sophisticated. The department must continually adjust its strategies to respond to these changing realities and remain vigilant in overseeing its operations abroad, which are impacted by the unpredictable political and security context.

While decades of globalization have contributed to the increased movement of people, commerce and ideas, in general, borders are hardening due to increased nationalism and concerns regarding immigration and security. Amid rising protectionist sentiments abroad, Canada continues to play a leadership role in promoting progressive approaches to trade and international collaboration in line with the government’s policy priorities to support inclusive economic growth and maintain support for trade.

Internal:

The department adapts its strategies and priorities to respond to the evolving external context and in order to remain effective and deliver results for Canadians within this context, the department is committed to ensuring that the department’s financial, human and IT resources are aligned with its priorities. This includes allocating financial resources to key priorities, ensuring that employees with the right skill sets are in the right positions and optimizing IM/IT processes.

Global Affairs Canada is a large department operating around the world with a variety of international partners. Within this context, the sound management of funds is critical. To strengthen financial management, Global Affairs Canada is improving its decision-making and investment activities by linking allocation decisions with risk assessments, performance information and evaluation findings and by providing its employees and partners with clearer guidance around the appropriate use of funds.

Global Affairs Canada employs staff working around the world and serves employees from other government departments operating from Canada’s offices abroad. Keeping federal employees safe and healthy at headquarters, in all of its regional offices and abroad is of paramount importance to the department. Global Affairs Canada is committed to overseeing the proper maintenance of buildings and other infrastructure, undertaking measures to mitigate environmental threats, such as air pollution and earthquakes, and providing employees with resources and work arrangements to improve mental health and wellness.

Key Risks

Corporate Risk 1: Personal and Physical Security

Operating in complex and challenging security environments abroad may affect the security of Canadian personnel, dependents, locally engaged staff and mission visitors.

Corporate Risk 2: Cyber Threats and Exfiltration of Information

A cyber-attack, exfiltration of information or limitations of government-wide systems could result in a breach of information held by the Government of Canada, leading to denial of service and creating a perception that Global Affairs Canada is not to be trusted with sensitive information.

Corporate Risk 3: Emergency Response and Business Continuity Planning

A significant natural disaster, emergency event, or hostile actions at missions and/or headquarters could disrupt operations department-wide.

Key Risks Tables
Corporate Risk 1: Personal and Physical Security (2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Link to the Organization’s Programs: All programs

Operating in complex and challenging security environments abroad may affect the security of Canadian personnel, dependents, locally engaged staff and mission visitors.

Risk Response Strategy

Key Strategy Components (from 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities):

  • Expanded and integrated threat information improved the department’s understanding of threats and vulnerabilities at missions.
  • A new integrated review process and better alignment of the department’s security assessments and standards enabled the department to better prioritize security measures at missions.
  • Clearer roles and responsibilities, better tracking of security recommendations and a stronger alignment between the Departmental Security Plan and Corporate Risk Profile contributed to better mission security planning.
  • The timely delivery of security equipment and physical security infrastructure projects strengthened mission security.
  • The deployment of expertise to missions, including the posting of mission security professionals to high-risk missions, improved mission security management capabilities.
  • The Hazard Prevention Program, timely provision of security training and strong senior management leadership cultivated a culture of security awareness and led to enhanced adoption of appropriate security behaviours by employees at missions.
Corporate Risk 2: Cyber Threats and Exfiltration of Information (2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Link to the Organization’s Programs: All programs

A cyber-attack, exfiltration of information or limitations of government-wide systems could result in a breach of information held by the Government of Canada, leading to denial of service and creating a perception that Global Affairs Canada is not to be trusted with sensitive information.

Risk Response Strategy

Key Strategy Components (from 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities):

  • Better IM/IT security monitoring tools improved threat awareness, and the timely sharing of threat information contributed to a greater understanding of IM/IT threats.
  • Greater alignment of security and risk planning processes and proactive engagement with Shared Services Canada helped to strengthen the department’s governance of cybersecurity.
  • Enhanced awareness of the department’s information, communication and IT protection needs contributed to a robust electronic network and more secure mobile communications.
  • Ongoing physical upgrades to controlled access areas and greater use of anti-infiltration tools helped to strengthen the security of areas that host sensitive information.
  • Targeted employee outreach and tailored training programs increased employee awareness of IM/IT security risks.
  • IM/IT safeguards were improved through upgrades to the department’s electronic network, the protection of information assets and the identification of secure communications solutions.
Corporate Risk 3: Emergency Response and Business Continuity Planning (2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities)

Link to the Organization’s Programs: All programs

A significant natural disaster, emergency event, or hostile actions at missions and/or headquarters could disrupt operations department-wide.

Risk Response Strategy

Key Strategy Components (from 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities):

  • The department’s emergency response surge capacity was expanded to include the use of a standing rapid deployment team, an emergency response community and regional emergency management officers.
  • Increased training and simulation exercises, including joint exercises with like-minded countries, improved the capabilities of the department’s emergency management and response teams.
  • The provision of timely warning of emergencies to key personnel and the Canadian public contributed to better emergency preparedness.
  • Enhanced information sharing and collaboration with other government departments helped to better enable a whole-of-government emergency response capacity.
  • The delivery of critical services was maintained during emergencies through the activation of the Mission Emergency Plan at missions and the development and activation of business continuity plans for critical services at regional offices and headquarters.
  • A stronger capacity to provide and communicate emergency management advice improved the department’s capacity to respond to slowly developing crises.

Results: What We Achieved

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.

Program 1.1: Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Policy

Description: Through this program, Global Affairs Canada draws upon its expertise at missions and headquarters to establish integrated foreign policy, international trade and development priorities and to provide information, intelligence and advice to ministers, senior officials and key partners to support decisions that advance Canadian values and interests.

Results

Canada furthered its commitment to contribute to a better, safer, more just, prosperous, and sustainable world. Through the development of integrated foreign policy priorities and whole-of-government country, regional and thematic strategies, Global Affairs Canada advanced Canadian values and interests on the world stage and enhanced Canada’s prosperity and security.

International Assistance

In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada completed its comprehensive review of Canada’s international assistance policy, funding, and delivery framework, as well as Canada’s approach to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Initiated in 2015-16, the International Assistance Review (IAR) involved broad consultations with a range of stakeholders including Canadian civil society, donor and partner governments, youth, people in developing countries and experts in the field of international assistance in Canada and overseas. More than 15,000 people participated in the consultations in person or online, and a summary of the feedback received was posted on the IAR website, What We HeardFootnote iii.

Number of Consultations

As part of the International Assistance Review, the department hosted 9 high-level consultations in 5 cities across Canada and undertook 40 smaller consultations in Canada with partners and experts. Canada’s missions abroad hosted over 300 consultations in more than 65 countries.

Building on the evidence gathered during the IAR, the Minister of International Development and La Francophonie launched Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy in June 2017. The goal of this ambitious new policy is poverty eradication. It recognizes that advancing gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls is the most effective way to reduce poverty and build a more inclusive, peaceful and prosperous world. The policy applies a feminist approach to Canada’s international assistance that is human rights-based and inclusive and refocuses assistance on the poorest and most vulnerable by promoting six interlinked areas for action: gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; human dignity; growth that works for everyone; environment and climate action; inclusive governance; and peace and security.

Six Areas for Action

The Feminist International Assistance Policy promotes :

Diversity and Inclusion

Respect for diversity and inclusion, important Canadian values, were fostered internationally through collaboration with partners across government, the private sector and civil society. In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada developed a global approach to respect for diversity and inclusion, centred on the premise that diversity can be a source of strength for society. To support engagement on issues of human rights and democracy, the department released Voices at risk: Canada’s guidelines on supporting human rights defendersFootnote iv and established the Digital Inclusion Lab to explore and identify innovative ways to address key issues at the intersection of human rights, inclusion and technology.

Canada continued to be a consistent voice on the international stage advocating for a more balanced perspective of human mobility, one that recognizes related challenges as well as opportunities. This perspective was advanced through Canada’s active participation in the negotiation of the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants at the UN Summit on Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants in September 2016. The Declaration lays the groundwork for the Global Compact on Refugees and a global compact for safe, orderly and regular migration in 2018, which will provide an international framework for human mobility while ensuring that the rights of vulnerable groups are protected. Canada further contributed to the protection of vulnerable groups through the endorsement of the Safe Schools Declaration, which seeks to protect students, teachers and their schools during armed conflict. The department also engaged in robust advocacy efforts in UN forums to urge improved compliance with international humanitarian law.

Advice and Decision-making

The department provided evidence-based policy advice to decision-makers based on integrated analysis of foreign policy priorities. Last year, Global Affairs Canada adopted an integrated approach to implement Canada’s Middle East Strategy in response to the crises in Syria and Iraq and to the development of a new whole-of-government strategy aimed at enhancing Canada’s engagement with China. Integrated legal and policy advice also advanced and defended Canada’s rights and obligations under international law on a broad range of issues such as international criminal, human rights and humanitarian, treaty, and environmental law, as well as Arctic issues.

Underpinning Canada’s international policies and priorities are internal systems that support accountability and evidence-based decision making. In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada completed 17 evaluations and launched an additional 15. These evaluations contributed to important evidence to support departmental decision making and helped improve policies, programs and initiatives in areas such as development programming, partnerships with civil society organizations, multilateral organizations, mission security and personal safety abroad, international peace and security programming, and departmental training.

Informing and Enabling Decision Making

In 2016-17, the department supported ministers by producing:

Results achieved
Expected resultsPerformance indicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
Government of Canada policies and strategies on how to advance Canada’s interests and values are well informed and integrated.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, policies and strategies to advance Canada’s interests and values integrate development, trade and foreign policy considerations, and are informed by results-based evidence, government priorities and expert advice.Obtain baseline information2017-04-014.4Indicator has changed.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
80,118,76082,390,19084,983,30184,371,5691,981,379
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
830809-21

Program 1.2: Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements

Description: Through this program, Global Affairs Canada uses diplomacy, advocacy, and program delivery, informed by consultations with domestic stakeholders, to engage and influence international players in order to advance Canadian interests and values.

Results

Over the past year, Global Affairs Canada has continued to deliver on the Prime Minister’s commitment to multilateralism and international reengagement, successfully promoting Canada’s interests and values for the benefit of Canadians at home and abroad.

Multilateralism and International Collaboration

Canada contributed to the maintenance and strengthening of a rules-based international order through its leadership on global issues, such as women’s rights and climate change. For example, on December 19, 2016, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a second resolution co-sponsored by Canada on child, early and forced marriage (CEFM). This also includes Canada’s pursuit of a non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council in 2021-22. The results of the department’s programming, diplomacy, and advocacy efforts can be seen throughout this report. Highlighted below are just a few of the many results of Canadian international engagement.

Canada continued to fully pay its assessed contributions for all of its memberships in international organizations including the UN, which earned Canada a place on the UN Honour Roll. Canada’s timely support facilitated the work of the UN and its specialized agencies in the achievement of their respective mandates. For instance, with Canada’s enhanced support ($5M per year for 2016-2018), the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights has greater capacity to promote and protect human rights around the world. The largest share of Canada’s assessed contributions went to support UN peacekeeping operations where civilians faced imminent risk, such as in Mali, South Sudan, the Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In 2016-17, the department successfully advanced Canadian security priorities, particularly in relation to threats stemming from weapons of mass destruction, instability and state fragility, international crime, terrorism and radicalization. For example, Global Affairs Canada advocated for and supported several key initiatives, including co-leading a UN General Assembly resolution to advance negotiation of a fissile material cut-off treaty that halts the production of explosive materials used in nuclear weapons. Global Affairs Canada also co-sponsored a UN Security Council resolution for the adoption and implementation of the UN Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism and the endorsement of the Stockholm Declaration on Addressing Fragility and Building Peace in a Changing World. Canada also co-sponsored a UN Security Council resolution which demanded that all parties to armed conflicts fully comply with their obligations to ensure respect and protection for medical personnel, and to facilitate safe and unimpeded passage for medical personnel and supplies. At the 2016 NATO Warsaw Summit, Canada announced that it would lead NATO’s enhanced Forward Presence in Latvia in support of a peaceful and stable Europe.

Over the past year, Canada took a number of steps toward accession to the Arms Trade Treaty which regulates the international trade in conventional weapons by states that have ratified the treaty. Global Affairs Canada introduced legislation in Parliament to fulfill Canada’s obligations under the Treaty upon accession. Additional information on how Canada contributes to increased international security and stability is provided in Program 3.1: International Security and Democratic Development.

Key international development priorities were also advanced this year through a wide variety of initiatives. In March 2017, $650 million was committed in support of women’s and girls’ sexual and reproductive health and rights. In May 2017, Prime Minister Trudeau announced the establishment of Development Finance Institute Canada, which will be located in Montreal. With an initial investment of $300 million, the Institute will support private sector investment in developing countries, with a particular focus on clean growth as well as women and youth-led businesses. The department also supported African Union member states in strengthening their risk management systems for climate-related risks with a contribution of $40 million over five years. Canada demonstrated strong leadership at the UN by leading a joint statement on inclusion and diversity at the UN Human Rights Council—the first of its kind. Beyond the UN system, Canada’s diplomatic achievements include participation in the founding of the Equal Rights Coalition, a new international coalition advocating for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex people. More information on Canada’s international assistance programming is provided in Program 3.2: International Development.

Progressive Trade Agenda
Transparent Approach to Trade

As part of its efforts to promote innovative trade practices, Canada ratified the UN Mauritius Convention on Transparency, which will ensure transparent investment arbitration processes once it enters into force in October 2017.

Last year, Global Affairs Canada continued to advance its progressive trade agenda. Canada and the EU signed the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), which entered into force on September 21, 2017 and will enhance economic opportunities for Canadians. Canada signed a free trade agreement (FTA) with Ukraine, engaged China in exploratory FTA discussions, initiated work on a joint feasibility study to assess the potential of an Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)-Canada Free Trade Agreement and reinvigorated talks on an economic partnership with India. Canada also ratified the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade Facilitation, which came into force in February 2017. This agreement benefits Canadian exporters by expediting and enhancing the predictability of customs and border procedures. More information about how the department helps Canadians pursue international business opportunities is provided in Program 2.1: International Commerce.

Development

Finally, Canada provided local partners in developing countries strategic funding to advance Canada’s values and interests abroad and address local development challenges. In 2016-2017, Canada provided support for 591 projects in 121 countries and the West Bank through 69 Canadian missions, reaching over 420,000 direct beneficiaries. Projects included workshops, training, advocacy campaigns, and legal and psychosocial services, with many projects implemented in support of specific beneficiary groups such as women and girls, the LGBTQI community, and refugees and migrants. For example, Canada supported efforts to promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls in a local decision-making Council in Cameroon, as well as training for military surgeons, surgical trainees, and nursing staff in Ukraine.

North America

The United States remains Canada’s most important partner on a comprehensive number of issues -- economic, security, environment, and people-to-peopleFootnote 1 relations. Last year, Global Affairs Canada continued to seek opportunities for constructive dialogue and concrete cooperation with its counterparts in the United States.

In February 2017, Prime Minister Trudeau visited President Trump in Washington, D.C. for an introductory meeting. In their Joint Statement, the two leaders identified priority areas for shared action including: economic growth; energy security and the environment; border security; international security; and women’s entrepreneurship. In dealings with U.S. decision-makers and stakeholders, Canada continues to demonstrate that it remains committed to NAFTA and is prepared to defend its interests and values in the negotiations to modernize the agreement. Canada’s objective is to better align the agreement to new trade and investment realities in a way that takes the North American relationship forward.

Also in February 2017, the Minister of Foreign Affairs met for the first time with the Secretary of State in Washington to discuss the priorities of Canada and the United States and as well as areas of collaboration. They stressed the importance of the economic relations between the two countries, which represent millions of middle-class jobs on both sides of the border. They also discussed balanced, mutually advantageous trade relations between Canada and the United States, as well as lumber.

Global Affairs Canada and Canada’s missions in the United States are integral to the coordination of, and support for, high-level Canadian engagement with political leaders and influencers across the United States. The goal of this outreach has been to build relationships within the new U.S. Administration, build alliances in support of Canadian interests across all levels of government, and emphasize the importance of the Canadian market to U.S. jobs and the overall economy.

Global Affairs Canada continued efforts to negotiate a new softwood lumber agreement between Canada and the United States in close cooperation with provincial, territorial and industry stakeholders. At the same time, the interests of the Canadian softwood lumber industry were defended during the U.S. anti-dumping and countervailing investigations and preparations were advanced for possible subsequent litigation.

During the last fiscal year, Global Affairs Canada also led the organization of several high-level meetings aimed at improving North American cooperation, such as the North American Foreign Ministers Meeting in Québec City in January 2016. These important dialogues laid the groundwork for Prime Minister Trudeau to host the North American Leaders’ Summit in Ottawa in June 2016, at which the leaders launched the North American Climate, Clean Energy, and Environment Partnership. The leaders also announced initiatives to streamline the flow of legitimate goods and trusted travelers across our borders to advance trade and competitiveness.

Europe

2016 marked the 40th anniversary of the Canada-European Union (EU) partnership.Footnote 2 Building upon this rich history of cooperation, Canada strengthened its strategic relationship with the EU through the signing of the CETA and the Canada-EU Strategic Partnership Agreement. The EU is Canada’s second-largest trading partner and CETA will allow Canadian businesses to take full advantage of new market opportunities. In support of the Strategic Partnership Agreement, the department will work with its EU counterparts to establish a Joint Cooperation Committee, a Joint Ministerial Committee, and a Leaders’ Summit to further enhance cooperation.

Officials from Canada and the EU met several times throughout the past year to discuss energy, climate change and the environment which led to an action plan on oil and gas markets and clean energy collaboration. Consultations on human rights advanced Canada’s positions on gender equality and inclusion, as well as on respect for diversity in advance of UN Human Rights Council meetings. Discussions on security focused on pressing issues, such as Ukraine, Syria, Iraq and Libya.

Arctic

Canada continued to demonstrate strong international leadership on domestic and international issues in the North. In November 2016, Canada hosted a Canada-Russia Arctic dialogue and sent delegations to key conferences to advance foreign policy interests with a broad range of international interlocutors, including Russia.

Promoting Canada’s Creative Industries

In collaboration with Canadian Heritage, the department introduced a new program to promote and showcase Canadian artists abroad and support creative industries in overseas markets. The department’s network of missions undertook 235 cultural diplomacy initiatives and 42 projects to support exports of creative industries in 2016-17. New positions, at home and in key markets abroad, were established to promote Canadian artists and creative industries.

At the Arctic Council, Canada worked to improve the balance between initiatives dealing with economic, social and cultural development and those dealing with environmental protection. The department supported projects aimed at increasing food production in the Arctic and reducing the incidence of suicide among youth in northern communities. To help safeguard the Arctic’s fragile environment, Global Affairs Canada also contributed to projects related to migratory birds, renewable energy, climate change and persistent organic pollutants.

Americas

Canada’s commitment to engagement with the Latin America and Caribbean region was underscored this year by high-level visits and a number of initiatives that supported inclusive growth, human rights, security and gender equality. Co-operation with regional and sub-regional organizations remained important, including with the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). Canada hosted Argentina’s Vice-President in order to initiate collaboration around the upcoming presidencies of the G7 (Canada) and the G20 (Argentina).

The department’s initiatives in the region related to economic growth, trade and investment positioned Canada as a strong proponent of a fair and open global trading environment. The participation of Canada’s Prime Minister, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Minister of International Trade at the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation Leaders’ meeting in Peru in November 2016 emphasized the importance that Canada places on shared prosperity and sustainable economic growth. In June 2016, Canada signed a Joint Declaration on Partnership with the Pacific Alliance, which includes Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru. Canada is the only observer country to have signed such an agreement with this important economic bloc.

Global Affairs Canada also continued to engage bilaterally with countries in the region to support efforts to improve regional security, collaborate on disaster risk reduction, and engage on justice reform. Minister Freeland and Minister Bibeau announced $78 million for development, peace and security initiatives to support the Colombian peace process. Through this funding, Canada specifically aims to encourage the full participation of women in the peace process and the peace mission in Colombia. The Minister of Foreign Affairs also travelled to Honduras and Guatemala to discuss ongoing work related to human rights, justice reform, security and anti-corruption. In Haiti, the department coordinated a whole-of-government response to Hurricane Matthew, including the deployment of the Canadian Disaster Assessment Team that developed a detailed assessment of the humanitarian needs. On Venezuela, the Department continued to advocate for the promotion and protection of democracy and human rights, including through a number of public statements, in particular a Ministerial statement released on 31 March calling on Venezuela’s government to restore democracy.

Middle East

Global Affairs Canada played a leading role in diplomatic efforts to reduce violence, improve humanitarian access in conflict zones, and sustain peace talks in the region, particularly in Syria. The department convened an unprecedented meeting with senior officials from 15 countries with a view to ending the deadlock on the peace process, achieving a sustainable ceasefire and establishing unhindered humanitarian access. Canada is also part of a core group of countries that spearheaded the launch of a UN accountability mechanism for crimes committed in Syria. In both Iraq and Syria, Canada was the lead donor in supporting efforts to document evidence and develop criminal case files aimed at prosecuting DaeshFootnote 3 and members of the Assad regime for breaches of International Criminal and Humanitarian Law.

As the gender focal point for the Global Coalition against Daesh’s Working Group on Stabilization, Canada advocated for the integration of gender and the Women, Peace and Security agenda in all stabilization efforts, including by funding a gender expert in the UN Funding Facility for Stabilization, and facilitating training on gender and security for Coalition members. Canada also co-hosted the Iraq Donor Pledging Conference in Washington, D.C., which raised more than US$2 billion in funds for humanitarian assistance, demining, and stabilization, to which Canada announced a contribution of $158 million.

Canada continued to engage key partners in the region to foster an enabling environment for peace in Libya. In September 2016, Canada participated in the Rome Ministerial Group on Libya that brought together 26 countries and international organizations to ensure policy coherence on stabilization issues.

The ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict hit a symbolic 50-year milestone in 2017. Canada took part in France-led ministerial efforts to uphold the Middle East Peace Process and arrive at a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Canada participated in a series of ministerial and senior officials’ meetings aimed at promoting the two-state solution.

Asia-Pacific

Canada’s engagement in the Asia-Pacific region has never been stronger. Over the past year, the department supported more than 40 high-level visits to China, including by the Prime Minister. Many of these visits included Canadian business leaders and resulted in commercial agreements worth billions of dollars. The department also supported the visit of the Chinese Premier to Ottawa and Montréal—the first visit by a Chinese leader to Canada since 2010. The Leaders’ visits resulted in 46 bilateral commitments that advance the relationship on strategic issues across a range of areas and priority sectors. This has generated enhanced commercial opportunities in various sectors, including agri-food, education and tourism. In 2016, there was an 11% increase in Chinese students studying in Canada to over 132,000 and a 24% increase in tourists from China to 610,000. These visits also resulted in the launch of exploratory discussions for a possible Canada-China free trade agreement and a memorandum of understanding with China securing access for $2 billion in Canadian canola exports through early 2020 while collaborative work continues on a permanent solution. As well, Canada has also supported efforts in China to enhance accountable governance and human rights.

Diplomacy and Protocol

State protocol services were provided to the Governor General, the Prime Minister, Global Affairs Canada ministers, and the foreign diplomatic corps accredited to Canada. A few highlights include: 47 incoming official visits to Canada, 137 visits abroad and 80 official events serving over 11,000 guests.

Canada’s commercial profile with India was also advanced through a series of visits by Ministers in both directions, which resulted in renewed commitments to conclude trade agreements in a timely manner and to resolve trade barriers affecting Canadian exports. In 2016-17, bilateral trade with India was valued at $8 billion, trade with Bangladesh reached a new high of $2.4 billion, and trade with Pakistan surged to a record $1.4 billion. To enhance trade with Japan, the department supported 26 high-level visits to Japan and convened an economic committee meeting to support Canadian exporters in the priority sectors of clean technologies, energy, infrastructure, natural resources, agri-food and educational cooperation. Canadian exports to Japan increased from $9.8 billion in 2015 to $10.7 billion in 2016, an increase of 9.2%. Moreover, the department’s efforts to showcase Canada as an attractive investment and innovation destination with privileged access to global markets helped attract significant Japanese investment to Canada that rose from $22 billion in 2015 to $29.1 billion in 2016, an increase of 32.3%. Canada also brought into force foreign investment promotion and protection agreements with Hong Kong (September 2016) and Mongolia (February 2017).

In 2016, the Minister of Foreign Affairs traveled to Cambodia, Myanmar, Singapore and Vietnam to promote human rights, freedom of religion or belief and discuss climate change and environmental concerns. At the ASEAN Regional Forum in Laos, the Minister of Foreign Affairs announced nine new initiatives, together worth more than $18 million, aimed at promoting regional security and stability in Southeast Asia. Also, Canada appointed its first dedicated ambassador to the ASEAN. During the ASEAN Economic Ministers Meeting, the Minister of International Trade announced initiatives to deepen Canada’s relationship with ASEAN, including an ASEAN-Canada Free Trade Agreement feasibility study, and $13 million to develop and support the integration into and access to global value chains and markets by small and medium-sized enterprises in ASEAN.

In collaboration with UN Women - the United Nations entity dedicated to gender equality and the empowerment of women – Canada supported greater equality between women and men before the law in seven Southeast Asian countries and helped to achieve stronger accountability and monitoring of women’s rights through the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women reporting process. Since 2011, about 1,140 gender equality champions in eight ASEAN countries have improved their knowledge and skills related to the Convention. These champions include government officials, parliamentarians, Supreme Court officials and representatives of civil society organizations. In addition, 25 laws or strategies that strengthen gender equality have been enacted in nine countries in Southeast Asia.

Africa

The department advanced Canada’s interests and values in the African continent through targeted high-level engagement. Prime Minister Trudeau travelled to Liberia to make progress on Canadian priorities, including the empowerment of women and girls, human rights and re-engagement with Africa to address challenges facing the continent. At the La Francophonie Summit in Madagascar, Prime Minister Trudeau announced $112.8 million for international development projects aiming to fight climate change, empower women, create job opportunities for women and young people, and prevent radicalization, the majority of which will be dedicated to countries in Africa.

The ministers of Foreign Affairs, International Development and La Francophonie, and National Defence visited several African countries, including Ethiopia, Kenya, and Nigeria. These visits reinforced strategic partnerships in the areas of development and international security. For example, in Nigeria, the Minister of Foreign Affairs co-chaired the Canada-Nigeria Bi-National Commission, which defined a roadmap for future cooperation with Africa’s most populous country. Canada also continued to engage with like-minded countries and regional organizations to provide on-going support to the peace process in South Sudan.

To help facilitate Canadian trade and investment in Africa, Canada signed and ratified foreign investment promotion and protection agreements with Mali (June 2016), Senegal (August 2016), Cameroon (December 2016) and Guinea (March 2017). Through these agreements and dialogue with regional governments and international partners, Canada helped foster stable, predictable, and transparent business environments in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in countries where Canada has major mining investments.

Results achieved
Expected resultPerformance indicatorsFootnote 4TargetsDate to achieve targets2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
International actors are engaged and influenced to gain support for actions consistent with Canada’s interests and values.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, Canada’s positions are reflected in bilateral agreements/initiatives.42017-04-013.20Footnote 53.54.11
Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, Canada’s positions are reflected in multilateral agreements/initiatives.42017-04-013.77Footnote 63.54.31
Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, Canada’s positions are reflected in bilateral, plurilateral and multilateral trade negotiations/ agreements.42017-04-01445
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
949,769,188957,781,2591,024,589,506896,561,089-61,220,170
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
1,6491,636-13

Strategic Outcome 2: International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians – Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.

Program 2.1: International Commerce

Description: Through this program, Global Affairs Canada delivers commercial services and advice to Canadian businesses and supports their pursuit of international business opportunities. This is primarily achieved through Canada’s Trade Commissioner Service, which organizes sector-specific, targeted trade missions to priority markets, helps Canadian businesses access global value chains and other opportunities, and supports the facilitation, expansion or retention of foreign direct investment, international innovation and science and technology partnerships.

Results

Making Canada a top destination for global investment remains a core priority of the government. As announced in Budget 2017, Global Affairs Canada developed a new trade and investment strategy. In support of this new strategy, the government committed $218 million over the next five years for the creation of the Invest in Canada Hub, which will be established in 2017. The Hub will work with federal entities and with provincial, territorial and municipal governments to make investing in Canada simpler and more attractive. While the Hub will be focused primarily on high-value transactions, it will also work seamlessly with Canada’s Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) in securing foreign direct investment and reinforcing a positive profile of Canada’s openness to international commerce.

The TCS continued to attract foreign investment and to help companies and organizations that were looking to export, invest abroad, attract investment abroad, or develop innovation and research and development partnerships. In 2016-17, the TCS facilitated 159 investor visits to Canada to pursue specific investment projects. In addition, 3,826 potential investors attended TCS investment-specific events, with 92% of survey respondents indicating that the event had increased their knowledge of investment opportunities in Canada. Through the Invest Canada Community Initiatives program, the TCS also helped increase employment opportunities by supporting the efforts of Canadian communities to attract, retain and expand foreign direct investment. As a result, the program approved $3.7 million in funding and assisted 87 communities across Canada. The TCS’s proactive engagement with key stakeholders facilitated 101 greenfield (new) and expanded foreign direct investments into Canada in 2016-17, with an estimated value of $2.25 billion and 2,979 jobs created.

In preparation for the implementation of several free trade agreements, Global Affairs Canada informed Canadian business, helped them understand how to access more markets and leveraged Canada’s FTAs and to reach more global consumers through e-commerce sales. Furthermore in 2017, Global Affairs Canada partnered with other organizations to launch the Canada Tariff Finder, an online tool created to assist exporters by providing data on tariff rates of Canada’s free trade agreement partners, such as the European Union countries, the United States, Mexico, South Korea, and Peru.

In 2016-17, 992 commercial agreements were concluded, an increase from last year, with a further 1,325 commercial agreements currently being pursued by Canadian companies with the help of the TCS. Canadian businesses continued to report high levels of satisfaction with TCS services, with 89.5% of clients indicating they were either satisfied or very satisfied with services provided, a 4.5% improvement compared to last year.

Creating Jobs for Canadians

Global Affairs Canada was instrumental in influencing Bell Helicopter to move one of its production lines to Mirabel (Quebec) for the production of the new 505 Jet Ranger helicopters. In June 2016, Bell Helicopter announced it would create 100 jobs in Mirabel.

The TCS continued to provide advice and information to Canadian companies in priority sectors. Global Affairs Canada is working to intensify support for the international clean technology sector, including through a $15 million commitment over four years for an International Business Development Strategy for Clean Technology that will aid Canadian firms in becoming world leaders in the export of clean and sustainable technology and processes. In 2016-17, the TCS identified 247 new clean technology clients, delivered 3718 services to clean technology clients and partnered with five clean technology industry associations. The TCS also worked closely with federal government partners, such as Natural Resources Canada, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, and Environment and Climate Change Canada, to streamline policies and programs to enhance Canada’s reputation as a partner of choice in the global clean technology sector.

The Canadian Technology Accelerator initiative pilot supported Canadian firms in the sectors of clean technology, information and communications technology and life sciences by providing mentorship from industry experts, technology validation, introductions to potential clients and partners, and office space in a business accelerator. Over 117 companies were served through the CTA in 2016-17, and the TCS is on track to serve 200 more companies over the following two fiscal years. Among CTA participants, 90% credited the initiative for helping their businesses grow. Since 2013, CTAs served 467 companies that reported 1,845 new jobs, $428 million in new capital raised, $154 million in new revenue, and over 800 strategic partnerships.

The TCS also offered programs to support exporters. For instance, through the CanExport program, the TCS was able to support 625 Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises looking to develop and expand their exports into new markets to fuel their growth. Since it was launched in January 2016, the program contributed over $15 million for small and medium-sized enterprises. Though most of the funded projects are still under way, over $45 million in export sales directly resulting from activities associated with a CanExport completed projects were reported by recipients.

In 2016-17, the TCS facilitated 260 international research and innovation partnerships and disseminated 452 research innovation leads, enabling Canadian businesses and organizations to access international networks, partners and resources that enhanced their ability to innovate. For example, the newly re-launched Going Global Innovation (GGI) program supported Canadian innovators to commercialize technology through key partnerships abroad. In 2016, GGI provided $829, 312 in funding to 104 innovators who signed contractual agreements with a total value of $7.395 million. Through the Canadian International Innovation Program (CIIP), which supports bilateral technology commercialization in targeted countries, Global Affairs Canada and the National Research Council Canada completed two calls for proposals with India, which funded technology projects for four Canadian companies. In addition, the CIIP enabled eight matchmaking events in Brazil, China and India involving 60 Canadian companies and resulting in two investment agreements ($1.8 million value) and six collaboration agreements.

The department maintained strong support for Canada’s education sector exports. In May 2016, the Governor General unveiled Canada’s new EduCanada brand at the world’s largest international education conference. The brand, jointly managed with the provinces and territories, conveys Canada’s status as a world-class destination for study and research. In September 2016, the Minister of Foreign Affairs signed a memorandum of understanding between Canada and China on education cooperation. Overall this sector has shown strong growth, with the number of international students and researchers in Canada growing by 17% (over 2015) to 413,015. This resulted in education service exports of over $15 billion that supported more than 165,000 jobs across Canada.

Results achieved
Expected resultsPerformance indicatorsTargetsDate to achieve target2016–17
Actual results
2015–16 Actual
results
2014–15 Actual
results
Canadian exporters, innovators and investors are successful in their international business development efforts.# of concluded commercial agreements facilitated by the TCS.1,0002017-04-011008963934
% of Canadian businesses that are satisfied with commercial services provided by the TCS.80%2017-04-0189.5%85%84.60%
Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.# of successful FDI projects (Wins) facilitated by the TCS.1002017-04-01101109106
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
194,782,982200,373,622201,998,216193,902,346-6,471,276
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
1,3591,338-21

Program 2.2: Consular Services and Emergency Management

Description: Through this program, Global Affairs Canada delivers high-quality consular assistance and travel advice to Canadians travelling, working and living abroad. This program also enables the department to coordinate the Government of Canada’s response to international emergencies.

Results

The department continued to deliver effective and updated consular services. Through Global Affairs Canada’s Emergency Watch and Response Centre, Canadians received timely and appropriate emergency consular assistance when in distress abroad, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada handled over 271,690 consular cases, including 6,190 cases related to Canadians who required urgent assistance while travelling or residing abroad. In a client feedback survey, Canadians reported high levels of satisfaction with routine consular services, with 92% indicating that they were either “satisfied” or “very satisfied”.

The department continued to ensure that Canadians had access to the information they need to make safe and smart travel decisions. Last year, the Travel Information Program provided travel advice to Canadians through the publication of 1,240 regular updates on Travel.gc.caFootnote v. Incidents covered included the terrorist attacks in Orlando, United States (June, 2016); Nice, France (July 2016); and Berlin, Germany (December 2016); the emergence of the Zika virus; and the attempted coup in Turkey (July 2016).

Timely Assistance

In 2016-17, 100% of inquiries to the Emergency Watch and Response Centre met the established service standard of callers waiting less than 1 minute on average for assistance (outside of exceptional crisis events). The average wait time was 25 seconds.

Using innovative technology, Global Affairs Canada continued to modernize consular services through the four key initiatives of the 21st Century Consular Plan. Under the Targeted Outreach and Going Digital initiatives, the number of followers for Global Affairs Canada’s travel social media channels increased by 94,628 (47%) over the past year to reach a total of 295,053. In addition, the department released version 2.0 of the Travel Smart mobile app, which provides travelers with accurate, user-friendly information on safe travel at their fingertips across the globe. In 2016, the app won the prestigious Government Technology Exhibition and Conference Award for Excellence in Public Service Delivery. As of March 2017, an estimated 48,000 users had downloaded the app.

Under the Focus on Children initiative of the Consular Plan, the department continued to undertake advocacy activities to increase the number of signatories to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, the international treaty that seeks to return wrongfully removed or retained children to their place of habitual residence.

In addition to helping Canadians abroad, the department continued to reinforce emergency preparedness with other federal entities to ensure timely and whole-of-government coordinated responses to international emergencies. Under the Strengthen our Response Network initiative, the department convened 23 Interdepartmental Task Force meetings in 2016-17 to respond to emergencies in Ecuador (earthquake, April 2016); South Sudan (civil unrest, July 2016); Turkey (attempted military coup, July 2016); the Caribbean (Hurricane Matthew, September 2016); and the Philippines (Typhoon Nock-ten, December 2016). In close consultation with other government partners, Global Affairs Canada also finalized the International Emergency Response Framework in November 2016, which clarifies mechanisms, procedures, and roles and responsibilities for coordinating the whole-of-government response to emergencies abroad.

To provide surge capacity to respond to unexpected critical incidents affecting Canadians or Canadian interests abroad, Global Affairs Canada maintained the Standing Rapid Deployment Team to respond to crisis situations. During 2016-17, nine Standing Rapid Deployment Team members were deployed in response to two emergencies—an earthquake in Ecuador and the assisted departure of Canadians out of South Sudan. To further support the department’s surge capacity, Global Affairs Canada developed 148 detailed geomaticsFootnote 7 products to provide those responding to and preparing for emergencies with more comprehensive information, including where Canadians are travelling and the location of assets, transportation hubs, and sites of risk or active emergencies.

Canada continued to provide international leadership and fostered increased international engagement and understanding of current consular policy and practice issues by acting as the Secretariat of the Global Consular Forum and chairing the forum’s steering committee. In October 2016, senior officials from 33 countries, including the United States, China, Japan, France and Great Britain, adopted the Seoul Consensus Statement on Consular Cooperation—the first statement adopted by the Global Consular Forum since its launch in 2013. The statement reflected the common desire of the Global Consular Forum members to cooperate and improve the delivery of consular services to their nationals. In May 2016, Canada and Australia signed a memorandum of understanding on crisis cooperation, building on the existing Canada-Australia Consular Services Sharing Agreement, which enables coordination and efficient use of resources.

In collaboration with Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada, Global Affairs Canada effectively managed the implementation of the Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA), a new entry requirement imposed on all visa-exempt foreign nationals arriving into Canada by air, except from the United States. As a result of this new requirement, the department issued over 205,610 passports at service delivery points abroad in 2016-17, a 10% increase from the previous year.

Results achieved
Expected resultsPerformance indicatorsTargetsDate to achieve target2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
Canadians receive satisfactory consular assistance abroad.% of Canadians satisfied with routine consular services.90%2017-04-0192%94%92%
Canadians are better informed on how to travel safely and responsibly.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, the Travel Advice and Advisories are accurate and of high quality.Obtain baseline information2017-04-013Indicator has changed
Whole-of-government response to emergencies is coordinated in a timely manner.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, international emergency response is coordinated with other government departments in a timely manner.42017-04-01444
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
52,012,00053,761,74453,733,70048,746,982-5,014,762
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
433420-13

Strategic Outcome 3: International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation – Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.

Program 3.1: International Security and Democratic Development

Description: This program contributes to increased international security and stability by enhancing the capacity of foreign governments, civil society and international organizations to manage international peace and security challenges and build stable, democratic foundations necessary for peace, sustainable development and poverty alleviation.

Results

Building a More Peaceful, Safer and Inclusive World

In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada worked with a broad range of partners, including key allies and multilateral organizations such as the UN, NATO and the Global Coalition against Daesh to reduce threats arising from a changing security environment, including state fragility, international crime and terrorism, violent extremism, space and cyber threats, and the proliferation of weapons, including weapons of mass destruction.

In 2016, Global Affairs Canada led the development of a framework to guide Canada’s renewed engagement in UN peace operations, which resulted in strengthened support to multilateral peace operations, mediation, conflict prevention, reconstruction and early recovery efforts. Canadian contributions to UN peacekeeping operations totalled $260 million in assessed contributions in 2016-17, making Canada the ninth-largest financial contributor. With Canadian support, UN peacekeeping operations assisted civilians facing imminent risk in areas such as Mali, South Sudan, the Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In addition to working with the UN and the African Union, Canada continued to collaborate with the EU and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) to undertake a range of measures in support of Ukraine’s sovereignty, security, and stabilization over the past year. The department supported conflict prevention and early recovery efforts through contributions of personnel and funds to the OSCE’s Special Monitoring Mission, in addition to other bilateral and multilateral development assistance projects. Global Affairs Canada also worked closely with the Department of National Defence to renew Operation Unifier, the Canadian Armed Forces mission to train and support the Ukrainian armed forces.

Canada’s role as a peacebuilder was further demonstrated by the launch of the new Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) in August 2016. The program anchors Canada’s whole-of-government coordination and response to violent conflict, crises and natural disasters abroad, with a focus on stabilization efforts. PSOPs advances Canada’s leadership in peacekeeping operations, as well as on key issues such as protection of civilians, women’s empowerment in peace and security, transitional justice, peaceful pluralism, respect for diversity, and human rights. Through PSOPs in 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada delivered over $200 million in grants and contributions, comprising 140 projects in 27 countries, including:

Furthermore, PSOPs delivered over $9 million in initiatives that promoted inclusion and respect for human rights, diversity and freedom of religion and belief in countries and regions affected by conflict or at risk of falling into conflict, such as Iraq, Mali, Syria and Ukraine. Leading by example, Canada promoted women’s participation in the area of peace and security through PSOPs with 13% of its projects focused on women, peace and security. The department also co-sponsored the launch of the National Focal Point Network on Women, Peace and Security, as part of the newly developed framework to guide Canada’s renewed engagement in UN peace operations.

Capacity Building
Middle East Strategy

As part of the whole-of-government Middle East Strategy, Canada expanded its diplomatic representation with the opening of two new missions in Iraq and 26 new positions in missions abroad covering Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Lebanon. This increased field representation, reinforced Canada’s relations in the region and enabled the provision of high-quality information, analysis and advice to support decision making.

Through the Canadian Police Arrangement, Canada maintained an average of 100 police officers deployed (18% women), while Global Affairs deployed a total of 12 civilian Government of Canada experts (50% of whom were women), to help build the capacity of local governments in the areas of transitional justice, criminal justice processes, and correctional system reform. In Haiti, for example, Canada’s experts supported the work of the UN Stabilization Mission to improve security conditions and support efforts to professionalize and strengthen the capacity of the Haitian National Police. During the national electoral process, which saw tensions in the country rise, Canada rapidly provided an additional 13 police officers as part of a temporary surge deployment. Canadian police were also deployed to Ukraine, the West Bank, Colombia, Iraq, the Philippines and Cambodia in training, mentorship, advisory and investigative roles.

Global Affairs Canada also continued to build the capacity of foreign governments, civil society and international organizations to address challenges to international peace and security, such as violent extremism, foreign terrorist fighters, and illicit forms of trafficking. For example, the department plays a key role in the Global Counterterrorism Forum which helped to develop the Hague-Marrakech Memorandum, which provides guiding strategies to assist countries in responding to the foreign terrorist fighter phenomenon. Also, anti-crime programming in the Northern Triangle countries (Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador) supported the training of law enforcement personnel and contributed to the seizure of illicit drugs and other criminal resources. Across all capacity building programming, gender equality and human rights considerations were systematically integrated. In 2016-17, approximately 20% of projects in the Middle East and North Africa region supported community-based initiatives largely involving women.

In order to help make the world safer, Canada undertook a wide array of initiatives to enhance the capacity of foreign governments and international organizations to stem the proliferation of weapons, including weapons of mass destruction. These initiatives included:

Results achieved
Expected resultsPerformance indicatorsTargetsDate to achieve target2016–17 Actual results2015–16 Actual results2014–15 Actual results
Reduced threats to Canadians, affected populations where Canada engages and globally from instability, state fragility, international crime, terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and/or chemical-, biological-, radiological-, nuclear-related materials.# of incidents interdicted or interrupted by intermediary over the past year in countries in which Global Affairs Canada engages.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 82017-04-01251Indicator has changed
# / total of countries where PSOPs is active that show an improvement in their scores in related and relevant indices (Fragile State Index, Global Peace Index, United Nations Office on Drugs Index and Corruption and World Governance Index).Obtain baseline information2017-04-018/26Footnote 9Indicator has changed
Increased freedom, human dignity and empowerment of all people, particularly for women, the poor, the marginalized and those at risk, as a result of Canadian engagement.# / total countries in which Global Affairs Canada engages with advancing democracy programming where the score in the Worldwide Governance indicators’ sub-indice on Voice and Accountability has increased.Obtain baseline information2017-04-016/20Footnote 10Indicator has changed
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
237,453,939237,901,526488,353,932465,232,381227,330,855
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
1561582

Program 3.2: International Development

Description: Canada’s International Development contributes to poverty alleviation by providing long-term support in developing countries and support for populations in fragile states or in conflicts. Priority programming themes draw on Canada's expertise, including in gender equality, sustainable economic growth, food security, education, and maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health and nutrition.

Results

This year, the department supported Canada’s development partner countries and regions based on their needs, their capacity to benefit from assistance, and in consideration of Canada’s priorities. In a context where Canada’s new international policy was being drafted, GAC still sought to refocus Canada’s international assistance on the poorest and most vulnerable, as well as on the priority of gender equality. For that reason, in March 2017 GAC announced funding to fill ongoing gaps with respect to health, sexual and reproductive rights of women and girls. To that end, Canada will facilitate better access to a complete range of health services, including family planning and modern contraception, comprehensive sexuality education, safe and legal abortion services, post-abortion care, and prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections. In support of these goals, Canada will invest $650 million over three years, and the programs will be implemented by experienced Canadian partners, developing country recipients (both local partners and governments), and global organizations.

In line with the results of the International Assistance Review, in June 2017, the department announced its Feminist International Assistance Policy, which will re-focus its international assistance on six new action areas: gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; human dignity; growth that works for everyone; environment and climate action; inclusive governance; and peace and security. To note, the narrative reporting provided below is based on the 2016-17 priorities. More detail on the new policy and its impacts will be presented next year.

Supporting Women’s Entrepreneurship

In Ethiopia, Canada contributed to the Women Entrepreneurship Program through the World Bank, which trained 12 microfinance institutions to service women’s micro and small businesses. 12 institutions delivered loans to nearly 3,000 women entrepreneurs, who reported increases in profits of more than 35% and 18% more employees.

Gender Equality

In 2016-2017, Canada stepped up its efforts to put gender equality and empowering women and girls at the heart of Canada's international assistance. In the area of gender equality, Canada supported the Together for Girls Partnership. As part of this initiative, in December 2016, the Government of Tanzania launched the landmark National Plan of Action to End Violence against Women and Children. With Canada’s support, the Together for Girls Partnership in Tanzania has facilitated the reporting of 52 cases of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation to the National Child Helpline between February 2016 and January 2017.

The Government of Canada has also partnered with CARE Canada on a $3 million project to prevent child, early and forced marriage in Mali and Benin. This has resulted in positive behavioural changes regarding certain socio-cultural norms related to child, early and forced marriage in eight of Benin’s ethno-cultural communities. As a result, fewer community elders now defend the practice of child, early and forced marriage. The percentage of traditional authorities, locally elected officials and religious leaders who defended the practice decreased from 41.7% to 15.5%.

In Bolivia, Canada and the Netherlands contributed to efforts to reduce gender-based violence and support the sexual and reproductive rights of women and girls. They also supported women’s and girls’ rights to economic and political participation. Canadian support assisted with the adoption of two laws as well. Law 348 aims to eliminate violence against women, and a gender identity law lets transgender people change their government identity documents. Since the project began in 2010, 12,878 women accessed sexual and reproductive health counselling services. As well, 719 women assumed political leadership positions and 3,291 women increased their incomes.

Health Programming

Canada’s health programming focused on the delivery of a full range of sexual and reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health and nutrition services for the poorest and most vulnerable populations. For example, in 2016-17, Canada reached 1.69 million women of reproductive age in Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Indonesia and 200,000 adolescent girls in India with iron and folic acid supplements to reduce rates of anemia and improve birth outcomes. Through the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, Canada supported polio eradication efforts, which led to the number of new polio cases falling to a historically low level: down from 350,000 cases to just 37 cases in over 100 countries. This is a drop of over 99% from when the polio eradication efforts began. Global Affairs Canada also encouraged organizations that were able to offer more sexual and reproductive health support to expand the range of services they provided to women and girls.

Supporting Women’s Health

In Bolivia, Canadian support for the sexual and reproductive rights of women and girls resulted in 12,878 women accessing sexual and reproductive health counselling services during the project period (2010-2017).

Sustainable Economic Growth

In 2016-17, Canada supported sustainable economic growth through projects that provided support to micro, small and medium-sized enterprises and farmers and helped to foster sound economic governance. As well, Canada contributed to World Bank programs and Asian Development Bank programs that helped small-holder farmers and entrepreneurs access capital. In Nepal, women had limited access to credit. Access to microfinancing enables women to start up or expand their production activities and obtain a return on their labour, through either a micro enterprise or agricultural activities. The Asian Development Fund in Nepal, supported by Canada, helped the Small Farmers Development Bank, of which 75% of members were women, implement needed reforms. As a result, by 2016 about 143,000 households in rural hill and mountain areas of the country received additional microfinance services—nearly five times as many as the original target of 30,000 - and 63% of the new entrepreneurs were women.

Canada’s support also aimed to build on the knowledge and skills of workers and entrepreneurs. In Burkina Faso, with the department’s support, Plan Canada established a partnership between government, the private sector and NGOs to enable girls and boys aged 13 to 18 to develop skills aligned with local labor market needs. Since 2011, a total of 8,265 young people, including 3,517 girls, have enrolled in non-formal basic education centres and vocational training centres supported by Plan Canada. Of these, 931 (including 239 girls) have found jobs.

Education and Training

Global Affairs Canada’s support also helped children, youth and adults gain access to quality education and training that provides the foundation for lifelong learning. Last year, Canada supported the Ministry of Education in Jordan and UNICEF through the Scaling-Up Access to Formal Education initiative. Canada’s contribution helped to provide 125,000 Syrian students, over half of whom are girls, with access to formal education in host communities and refugee camps. By contributing to WinS for Girls, a program led by UNICEF and the UN Girls’ Education Initiative, Canada helped to increase the number of girls transitioning from primary to secondary school by addressing their water, sanitation, and menstrual hygiene needs. In Peru, through UNICEF, Canada contributed to improving access to and quality of education for more than 500,000 primary level rural, including Indigenous, children through improved teacher training and educational materials in both native and Spanish languages. In Afghanistan, Canada has invested in community-based education, one of the most effective strategies to increase access to education in remote areas of the country. Canada has also supported teacher training, particularly for women. The Community-Based Girls' Education Project implemented by the Bangladesh-headquartered non-governmental organization, BRAC, and completed in 2016, established more than 4,000 community-based schools, enrolling 122, 979 Afghan students (83% girls).

Sustainable Agricultural Development and Food Security

Canada focused on sustainable agricultural development, food assistance and nutrition, and agricultural innovation to support food insecure populations. As environmental degradation is increasingly affecting economies and the security and well-being of people, in particular the poorest and most vulnerable in developing countries, ensuring environmental sustainability, including access to clean water, and addressing climate change are key objectives for Canada.

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)

With support from Canada and other donors, IFAD reached over 112 million people in rural areas, half of whom were women. IFAD’s work on inclusive rural finance contributed to improving access of over 22.2 million people to rural financial services. In addition, IFAD provided training to 2 million people in crop production practices and technologies to increase their agricultural productivity.

Between 2012 and 2016, Global Affairs Canada’s support for the Sustainable Land Management Program contributed to the rehabilitation of 68,175 hectares of land in Ethiopia through the use of sustainable land management practices by 43,839 households (of which 9,926 were women-led households). This has increased agricultural production and the resilience of vulnerable communities, in particular women, to the impacts of climate change. In addition, the construction of drinking water supply systems reduced the time women spent fetching water.

In 2016-17, through the World Food Programme, Canada provided training in climate change resilience to over 6,000 families in Guatemala. As a result, 80% of the targeted communities succeeded in enhancing their community assets (i.e. using improved water irrigation and collection systems, agro-forestry, and soil conservation techniques), enabling them to increase their resilience to climate change and associated disasters. Furthermore, 30,235 beneficiaries in Zacapa and El Progreso (51% women) received food assistance while improving the resilience of their communities, including through soil and water conservation.

In the area of environmental sustainability, Canada continues to support the Paris Agreement and is working hard with international partners to deliver on its pledge to contribute $2.65 billion in climate finance to support the transition of developing countries to low-carbon, climate-resilient economies. Canada’s contribution will be invested in sectors such as clean technology and renewable energy, climate-smart agriculture, sustainable forest and water management, and climate risk resilience. With Canada’s support, the Least Developed Countries Fund supported improved resilience to climate change in Mali’s agriculture sector project by increasing the capacity of vulnerable populations to adapt to climate change impacts on agricultural production and food security. The project has supported 681 farmers in 113 villages to implement adaptive technologies and techniques which has led to an 83.5% increase in harvest yields and a 54% increase in uptake of new practices and technologies in the region.

Women’s Socio-Economic Empowerment

Through Canada’s Promoting Social Cohesion through Community Support project, 700 Iraqi women from various cultural backgrounds learned more about their rights and participated in decision-making processes within their communities.

Last year, the department worked with Canadian civil society organizations and partners to find innovative ways to address development challenges and support the implementation of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. In the context of the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund, cooperation between McGill University and the Universidad Nacional de Colombia resulted in the development of three new native varieties of nutritious, disease-resistant potato in Nariño province, Colombia’s second most food insecure region. Jointly funded by Global Affairs Canada and the International Development Research Centre, the outcome of this research increased the income of vulnerable farmers by 18%, and certified seeds are now being introduced to the rest of Colombia.

Good Governance

Global Affairs Canada also supported governance programming. For example, from 2013-2016 Canada supported the International Foundation for Electoral Systems to strengthen the Election Commission of Pakistan, training over 1,800 permanent staff. This enabled the Commission to train over 450,000 election poll workers, add approximately 1.2 million new people to the electoral rolls, and register almost 5,900 people with disabilities (including over 2,800 women) to vote.

Engaging and Educating Canadians

The department increased the engagement of Canadian women, men and youth in international development, notably through International Development Week in February, a key platform for provincial and regional councils for international cooperation and other partners to share knowledge. As part of this engagement, the Minister of International Development met with students from the University of Ottawa’s School of International Development and Global Studies to discuss topics including women’s empowerment in conflict and post-conflict settings, climate change adaptation, and human rights conventions that protect vulnerable groups. The week provided Canadians with opportunities to support development work overseas and build ties as global citizens. In the Volunteer Cooperation Program, 1,445 Canadian volunteers (835 women, 610 men) were deployed across 42 countries through 15 Canadian volunteer sending partners. Youth initiatives, such as the International Youth Internship Program and the International Aboriginal Youth Internships, supported 362 internships (272 women, 90 men) contributing to poverty reduction in 37 developing countries through 22 Canadian organizations.

Results achieved
Expected resultsPerformance indicatorsTargetsDate to achieve target2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
Improved sustainable economic prosperity for the poor, particularly women and youth, in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in sustainable economic growth programming.# / total of countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in sustainable economic growth programming that show a decrease in unemployment (% of total labour force modeled International Labour Organization estimate).43%2017-04-0119/44 countries or 43%Footnote 11Indicator has changed
Increased well-being and empowerment of children and youth in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in children and youth programming.# / total of countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in maternal, newborn and child health programming in which under-five mortality (deaths per 1000 live births) has decreased, or shown no significant change.98%2017-04-0141/42 countries or 98%Footnote 12Indicator has changed
Increased food security for food insecure populations, in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in food security programming.# / total of countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in food security programming in which the number of people undernourished has decreased, or shown no significant change.64%2017-04-0125/39 countries or 64%Footnote 13Indicator has changed
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
2,332,030,7552,335,188,9382,655,864,1092,553,957,625218,768,687
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
882848-34

Program 3.3: International Humanitarian Assistance

Description: Through this program, Global Affairs Canada reduces the vulnerability of people in crisis situations, such as during armed conflicts, acute food insecurity and natural disasters, by providing timely and appropriate funding for food, water, shelter, protection and health, in particular in terms of sexual and reproductive health. It also provides long-term institutional support to key partners to improve the speed of their reactions and the flexibility of their responses during a crisis.

Results

This year, Canada continued to focus its international humanitarian assistance on saving lives, alleviating suffering and maintaining the dignity of those affected by conflicts or natural disasters, especially for the most vulnerable populations, including women and girls. Global Affairs Canada’s assistance is provided in close cooperation with other government departments and through experienced international partners, including the United Nations World Food Programme, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, UNICEF, UN Women, the UN Population Fund, the International Committee of the Red Cross, and a number of non-governmental organizations.

Over the past year, humanitarian needs arising from natural disasters, acute food insecurity, health emergencies and armed conflicts have once again reached unprecedented levels, mainly due to the intensification of conflict in several parts of the world. More than 141 million people are in need of immediate humanitarian assistance, with more than 65 million people displaced by conflict, violence and persecution. Global food insecurity has also reached record levels, with some 70 million people across 45 countries estimated to require emergency food assistance, of which the majority are women and children.

In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada assisted the provision of timely emergency food assistance (and nutrition assistance) to 82.2 million beneficiaries in 82 countries. Furthermore, 12.9 million refugees and 48 million internally displaced persons were assisted and protected through Canadian humanitarian assistance. Notably, Global Affairs Canada provided $119.25 million to respond to severe food crises affecting more than 20 million people in northeastern Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen. A substantial portion of the humanitarian assistance provided by Global Affairs Canada has directly countered sexual and gender-based violence. For example, with Canada’s assistance, the United Nations Population Fund set up a specialized treatment centre for women and girls liberated from ISIL, including Yazidi, at the Dohuk hospital. The centres supported by the Fund were able to provide services to over 2,300 survivors of sexual violence. The department also provided support to respond to a number of smaller crises, including for the Canadian Red Cross mobile clinic to treat more than 3,500 patients after Hurricane Matthew in Haiti, and to Oxfam-Québec, Oxfam Canada, CARE Canada and Plan International Canada, to provide 38,000 people in Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Uganda with safe drinking water, shelter items, and cash transfers.

At the World Humanitarian Summit in May 2016, Canada strongly supported the Grand Bargain initiative, which saw 52 aid agencies and major donors collectively sign 51 commitments to make humanitarian financing more efficient and effective. Together, the World Humanitarian Summit and Grand Bargain include commitments to better link humanitarian and development programming, increase focus on gender equality in emergencies to address gender-based violence and provide more flexible multi-year funding to allow Canada’s partners to better plan and manage financial resources.

Canada is following through on its World Humanitarian Summit commitments. In 2016-17, 56% of Canada’s humanitarian assistance funding was multi-year, compared to 12% the previous year. For example, the department is providing multi-year funding in response to the crises in Syria and Iraq ($755 million in humanitarian assistance from 2016-17 to 2018-19), as well as multi-year funding to protracted crises in Africa. In addition, Canada committed to several new multi-year funding agreements in 2016 with partners such as the World Food Programme, the Canadian Foodgrains Bank, the Central Emergency Response Fund and the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

Results achieved
Expected resultsPerformance indicatorTargetDate to achieve target2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
Reduced suffering, increased and maintained human dignity and lives saved in communities experiencing humanitarian crises or that are acutely food insecure in countries where Global Affairs Canada engages in humanitarian programming.# of people reached with humanitarian assistance and protection activities.Not applicableNot applicable96.2 million81.6 million76.7 million
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
561,725,322561,922,614898,575,988852,045,849290,123,235
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
69690

Strategic Outcome 4: Canada’s Network Abroad – The department maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.

Program 4.1: Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services

Description: Through this program, Global Affairs Canada works with 37 partner departments and co-locators, such as the Government of Australia and the provinces of Quebec and Ontario, to provide strategic governance, deliver efficient and cost-effective services, and provide infrastructure for its network of 178 missions in 110 countries.

Results

The department continued to provide support for Canada’s presence abroad through the management and delivery of resources, infrastructure and services.

The safety and security of personnel, assets and information at missions abroad remained a priority. In 2016-17, the department completed baseline threat assessments for all missions abroad, which are regularly updated when threat levels change. In addition, the department completed 12 property infrastructure projects to increase the safety and security at missions, including major projects in Brazil, India and Tanzania. A new research and development program for physical security equipment was established in partnership with the Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory. Also in 2016-17, electronic security systems were upgraded at select chanceries, and security enhancements were made via 60 additional installations, bringing the total number of completed upgrade installations at missions to 122.

With the support of key federal partners, such as Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and Shared Services Canada, the department strengthened logistics services for projects at missions, including Canada 150th anniversary celebrations in various missions and the opening of three new missions abroad (Baghdad and Erbil in Iraq and Cotonou in Benin).

In 2016-17, 70% (3.5 out of 5) of heads of mission and program managers at missions surveyed indicated that the International Platform Branch enables the department to achieve its international priorities. Also, 60% (3 out of 5) of partners and co-locators that were surveyed by the department indicated that cooperation between Global Affairs Canada and mission partners was effective and common servicesFootnote 14 were clearly defined, sustainably delivered and effectively managed. In light of these results, the department will seek to improve the way in which it engages with clients and stakeholders by implementing best practices and lessons learned identified through comprehensive reviews of the common services framework.

In May 2016, Global Affairs Canada launched its Real Property Investment Plan aimed at strengthening strategic governance and decision-making oversight of Canada’s real property assets abroad. The five-year plan identifies 148 real property projects to address business continuity, security, and health and safety requirements, as well as enabling long-term cost-savings opportunities. To enhance Canada’s diplomatic network at minimum cost to taxpayers, the department implemented cost-effective real property strategies, such as co-locating with other like-minded governments. In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada finalized a co-location within the Embassy of the Netherlands in Cotonou, Benin, and established offices within the Embassy of the United Kingdom in Lusaka, Zambia. A memorandum of understanding was also negotiated with Canadian provinces and territories to establish a generic co-location agreement in Canada’s missions abroad.

The department continued to transform and modernize the delivery of common services to missions abroad through various initiatives—such as the standardization of contracts for the provision of security guard services and the establishment of regional pre-arranged prices for the procurement of vehicles—thus improving business practices, reducing transactional activities and enabling efficiencies.

The department strengthened its collaboration and engagement with international partners to improve the efficiency of logistics services supporting Canada’s network of missions abroad. For example, Global Affairs Canada hosted the 16th International Conference of Heads of Diplomatic Courier Services, where discussions with key partners such as Australia, France, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States focused on opportunities and challenges in the logistics field.

Results achieved
Expected resultPerformance indicatorsTargetsDate to achieve target2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
Efficient and effective governance, strategic direction and common services are provided to Canada’s mission network abroad.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, Global Affairs Canada cooperates with mission partners to ensure that common service standards are clearly defined and common services are sustainably delivered.42017-04-0133.74.3
Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, the International Platform Branch enables the department to achieve its international priorities by providing sound governance, strategic direction, and efficient and cost-effective common services to the mission network.42017-04-013.53.13.4
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
667,852,766764,948,263822,489,980702,069,649-62,878,614
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
4,1514,295144

Program 4.2: Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad

Description: Through this program, the department and central agencies manage and administer statutory payments to Government of Canada employees abroad, both Canada-based staff and locally engaged staff. This includes Foreign Service Directives payments, which are the benefits and allowances for Canada-based staff serving abroad, as well as pension and insurance benefits and affiliations in local social security programs for locally engaged staff.

Results

In 2016-17, Global Affairs Canada continued to efficiently manage and administer payments to Government of Canada employees abroad, ensuring the government is able to attract and retain qualified staff to advance its interests, while maintaining effective stewardship over public funds.

Global Affairs Canada continued to engage with bargaining agents and other government departments through the National Joint Council of the Public Service of Canada. The department’s leadership was demonstrated through chairing, managing and participating in interdepartmental governance structures, including the working group forums for policy interpretation and consultation, the Interdepartmental Hardship Post Committee and the Committee on Accommodation Deficiencies. In 2016-17, the department’s contribution of proposals to the cyclical review of the Foreign Service Directives, scheduled for 2017-18, was formulated and submitted. The assessment of the department’s role at the National Joint Council demonstrates a similar level of engagement compared with last year.

The program’s performance was also measured by the delivery of Foreign Service Directives benefit payments in accordance with service standards. The percentage of required allowances paid to Canada-based staff within service standards was 90% in 2016-17, compared to 65% in 2015-16. Benefit payments to locally engaged staff were made accurately and within established service standards in 100% of cases, compared to 96% in 2015-16.

To improve the long-term sustainability of the Locally Engaged Staff Pension, Insurance and Social Security program, a global program review was undertaken to identify and leverage operational efficiencies, standardize the approach to providing benefits to locally engaged staff, and enhance the financial sustainability of the program. The department completed the initial phases of the global review and results were submitted to the Treasury Board Secretariat, as the employer and benefit plan sponsor on behalf of the Government of Canada, for their consideration.

Results achieved
Expected resultsPerformance indicatorsTargetsDate to achieve target2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
The department provides leadership to interdepartmental governance structures and the National Joint Council on Foreign Service Directives (FSD) policies.Degree to which, on a scale of 1 to 5, the department coordinates and participates in interdepartmental FSD governance structures and National Joint Council.42017-04-014.54.54
FSD and locally engaged staff (LES) benefits are paid pursuant to the required terms and on a timely and accurate basis.% of required FSD payments to Canada-based staff that are made accurately and within established service standards.Footnote 1580%2017-04-0190%65%80%
% of required benefit payments to LES that are made accurately and within established service standards.Footnote 1675%2017-04-01100%96%99.5%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
203,620,216203,795,103232,167,076229,333,16125,538,058
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
5549-6

Internal Services

Description: Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

Management and Oversight

Over the past year, the department’s Executive Board and its governance committees continued to strengthen policy coherence and align resources with the government’s priorities. In 2016-17, the Treasury Board Secretariat introduced a new Policy on Results, which highlights the importance of evaluation and performance information in management, decision making and public reporting.

In support of the Policy, the department worked toward developing a new Departmental Results Framework that reflects the amalgamated department and will ensure that Global Affairs Canada effectively articulates its responsibilities, expected results and methods to measure progress to Canadians. The Policy on Results supports the Government of Canada’s Results Agenda, which renews and refines the approach to report meaningful results for Canadians. In addition, to track progress on departmental commitments, a new Delivery Unit was established in 2016. The role of the Unit is to take stock of progress and ensure mitigation strategies are in place to optimize chances of success. The Unit will report publically on progress against commitments through the Government of Canada’s online Results Portal, once operational.

The department also strengthened its tools to prioritize investments, including investments related to real property and security to support evidence-based decision making. In addition, strong risk frameworks and assessment tools were developed for the Canada Fund for Local Initiatives, as well as for the Foreign Service Directives for monitoring activities.

In 2016-17, the Office of the Inspector General conducted 8 full mission inspections and 56 e-inspections, as well as 26 administrative investigations, including those related to values and ethics (harassment and disclosure), fraud and loss of funds. In addition, the Office of the Chief Audit Executive completed 13 internal audits to assure that risk management, governance and internal control processes are effective. Notable audit subjects included diplomatic mail, human resources management, information technology security, as well as the Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Initiative.

In support of workplace well-being, working groups comprising working-level and senior management employees selected primary areas of focus from the Psychological Health and Safety Standard, such as organizational culture, leadership, civility and respect, recognition and rewards, and workload management.

Communications

Global Affairs Canada remained the most active federal department in social media presence last year. More than 500 social media accounts at missions and headquarters communicated Canada’s foreign policy priorities through Twitter and Facebook posts. The department issued more than 110,000 tweets last year resulting in more than 1.3 million ‘engagements’, which are the shares, likes and comments that help the department reach even larger audiences. On Facebook, the department’s 74,000 posts generated more than 5 million engagements. The department also continued to manage the largest number of media calls across government, more than 3,400, reflecting its international mandate and role in protecting Canada’s interests and stature abroad. The department continued its communications support in the delivery of public diplomacy and advocacy activities, which included providing training for Canada’s diplomats in a wide variety of communications areas.

In advance of and during the 150th anniversary of Canada’s Confederation in 2017, the department promoted the international dimension of the celebrations by providing communications tools, guidance and digital engagement services to missions and partners. Global Affairs Canada also worked with communities of students taking Canadian studies courses abroad to increase their understanding of Canada and promote Canada’s cultural industries. Global Affairs Canada also continued to play a leadership role in the development and implementation of the Government of Canada’s new web presence, including coordinating content from more than 30 other departments.

Legal Services

Global Affairs Canada provided high-quality legal services and advice to departmental clients, other government departments and Crown corporations on a broad array of issues. In 2016-17, support and advice was provided on 52 treaty actions, primarily authorizations for signature and ratification, and on approximately 90 non-legally binding instruments (memorandums of understanding) to ensure that legal risks were mitigated prior to signature.

Human Resources Management

Global Affairs Canada focused on human resource planning and service delivery to foster a workforce that is diverse, agile, flexible and capable of delivering on the government’s priorities. In support of this objective, seven business processes were implemented to improve service efficiency and effectiveness and reduce costs, while enabling sharing of best practices. The department continued to implement a competency-based approach to align workforce management with business needs. As a result, competency profiles were developed, administrative processes and functions were centralized to achieve greater efficiencies and assignment practices and policies continue to be developed.

In 2016-17, Canadian Foreign Service Institute delivered 1,034 courses in the areas of corporate accountability, international affairs training and intercultural effectiveness, as well as training on up to 40 foreign languages, to 11,062 internal participants. In addition, almost 3,000 employees from other government departments received training delivered by the Institute on a cost-recovery basis.

In 2016, Global Affairs Canada implemented a Hazard Prevention Program. As part of this program, the department developed an innovative and first-of-its-kind web application promoting safe and healthy work practices and procedures in the workplace. Finally, a departmental-wide Disability Management Unit and program was established to enhance the new service delivery model, guidelines and materials to effectively support the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy.

Financial Management

Global Affairs Canada continued to optimize management and stewardship of financial resources. In its 2016-17 Management Accountability Framework (MAF) result, the department was recognized for proactively assessing multi-year financial risks associated with projected salary expenditures, budgetary changes, revenues and funding pressures. These best practices reduced operational costs and ensured coordination across departmental streams.

To enhance the dissemination of information on transfer payments, the department prepared a pilot program to monitor and report service standards for international development assistance grants and contributions. Data is expected to be available at the beginning of 2018-19.

In 2016, the department’s Investment Plan was approved by the Treasury Board Secretariat. This led to the development of a new enterprise-wide investment planning process that identifies real property and information management and information technology projects based on prioritization models, aimed at strengthening decision making.

Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT)

Over the last year, Global Affairs Canada worked closely with Shared Services Canada to ensure that IT-enabled solutions met the needs of the department, particularly given the international nature of its work. The department ensured its projects aligned with government-wide IT priorities, such as the record management system updates, email transformation and web renewal initiatives. The department furthered its transformation initiative and piloted a data analytics training program to improve data literacy across the organization. This training received an honorable mention from the Association of Public Sector Information Professionals.

Real Property, Materiel and Acquisition

Public resources and departmental assets were effectively managed and allocated. The department aligned its procurement planning with its business planning activities, engaged internal stakeholders to ensure timely and transparent procurement processes and communicated plans to support decision making. In its 2016-17 MAF result, the department was recognized for integrating competency-based management into all of its talent management activities for the procurement and materiel management functional specialist communities.

Significant progress was made in cooperation with Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada to improve the alignment of real property management with GAC’s Investment Plan and Domestic Accommodation Real Estate Strategy. For example, planning for the 125 Sussex Retrofit, optimization of space at Place Du Centre, and work to consolidate Global Affairs Canada training activities were advanced, supporting investment planning goals and establishing a more robust expenditure planning framework to enable a update of the department’s Domestic Accommodation Real Estate Strategy in 2017-18.

In support of the effective management and allocation of departmental assets, Global Affairs Canada is actively engaged with Public Services and Procurement Canada through the Interdepartmental Committee on Supplier Relationship and Performance Management to establish a systemic vetting process, ensuring that the performance and legal compliance of potential vendors are prioritized in contract decisions.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
Total authorities
2016–17
Actual spending
2016–17
Difference
2016–17
236,174,969244,123,374252,227,835233,804,155-10,319,219
Human resources (FTEs)
Planned 2016–17Actual 2016–17Difference 2016–17
1,5171,382-136

Analysis of Trends in Spending and Human Resources

Actual Expenditures

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Departmental Spending Trend Graph
Text Alternative

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

The above graph presents the department’s spending trend from 2014-15 to 2019-20, divided into three spending categories: voted spending (in dark blue), which is provided by Parliament to support program delivery and for managing the department’s resources; statutory spending (in red), for expenditures mandated by legislative regulations; and, anticipated sunset programs (in light blue), which is funding that is scheduled to expire, but could be subject to renewal.

Expenditures for 2014-15 and 2015-16 reflect the financial information previously reported in the Public Accounts. The increase of $57.5 million for those years reflects funding received for the provision of critical humanitarian assistance to address the needs of people affected by ongoing conflicts, such as in South Sudan, Syria and Iraq. From 2015-16 to 2016-17, the increase of $263.2 million in actual spending is attributable to additional funding received for the Africa Renewable Energy Initiative and Climate Fund for the private sector in Asia, funding to address the crises in Iraq and Syria and the impacts on the region, funding to provide humanitarian assistance for people affected by conflicts or disasters, as well as funding for the Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs).

From 2017-18 to 2019-20, Global Affairs Canada’s spending profile varies from $6.1 billion in 2017-18 to a projected low of $5.8 billion in 2019-20. Significant items contributing to the net projected $300 million decrease in funding include the following programs:

Reductions in planned spending are also impacted by carry forward amounts (in the operating and capital budgets) to be received in 2017-18 only, as per Treasury Board policies.

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities available for use
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Actual spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Actual spending (authorities used)
1.1 Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development Policy80,118,76082,390,19084,279,76483,783,89784,983,30184,371,56976,209,29780,716,032
1.2 Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements949,769,188957,781,259982,515,627943,179,8011,024,589,506896,561,089954,956,846873,716,723
Subtotal1,029,887,9481,040,171,4491,066,795,3911,026,963,6981,109,572,807980,932,6581,031,166,143954,432,755
2.1 International Commerce194,782,982200,373,622205,010,348197,367,838201,998,216193,902,346164,459,301170,222,816
2.2 Consular Services and Emergency Management52,012,00053,761,74456,140,96755,288,24053,733,70048,746,98248,404,46649,512,462
Subtotal246,794,982254,135,366261,151,315252,656,078255,731,916242,649,328212,863,767219,735,278
3.1 International Security and Democratic Development237,453,939237,901,526475,585,381343,382,490488,353,932465,232,381364,417,410330,049,668
3.2 International Development2,332,030,7552,335,188,9382,337,470,1632,659,521,4262,655,864,1092,553,957,6252,480,948,6582,392,774,063
3.3 International Humanitarian Assistance561,725,322561,922,614726,443,560639,181,486898,575,988852,045,849700,103,212805,970,755
Subtotal3,131,210,0163,135,013,0783,539,499,1043,642,085,4024,042,794,0293,871,235,8553,545,469,2803,528,794,486
4.1 Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services667,852,766764,948,263735,657,199657,946,968822,489,980702,069,649693,665,951766,291,707
4.2 Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad203,620,216203,795,103234,379,557218,732,690232,167,076229,333,161234,377,684198,792,503
Subtotal871,472,982968,743,366970,036,756876,679,6581,054,657,056931,402,810928,043,635965,084,210
5.1 Internal Services236,174,969244,123,374250,124,702243,718,478252,227,835233,804,155279,309,741271,297,428
Subtotal236,174,969244,123,374250,124,702243,718,478252,227,835233,804,155279,309,741271,297,428
Total5,515,540,8975,642,186,6336,087,607,2686,042,103,3146,714,983,6436,260,024,8065,996,852,5665,939,344,157

Explanation of Variances

The above table provides an overview of the Department’s financial performance over the past three years, and also includes anticipated spending through to the 2018-19 fiscal year. The table includes the Total Authorities available for use (total amount the Department received in spending authority during the year), actual spending (amount the Department actually spent in the specified fiscal year), Main Estimates (initial financial resources for the delivery of departmental programs) and planned spending (actual anticipated spending over the course of the fiscal year).

For 2016-17, the variance between the Main Estimates ($5,515.5 million) and planned spending ($5,642.2 million) was attributable to funding received after the submission of the Main Estimates, such as the Operating and Capital Budget carry forward (unused funds) from 2015-16 and the reimbursement of paylist expenditures. Paylist expenditures refer to those expenses primarily related to severance pay and parental benefits for Canada-based and locally engaged staff at missions abroad.

The variance between planned spending ($5,642.2 million) and total authorities ($6,715.0 million) is related to supplementary funding received during the fiscal year, such as funding for the Africa Renewable Energy Initiative and Climate Fund for the private sector in Asia, funding to address the crises in Iraq and Syria and the impacts on the region, funding to provide humanitarian assistance for people affected by conflicts or disasters, as well as funding for PSOPs. The variance ($617.8 million) between planned spending and actual spending in 2016-17 is explained by program below.

Explanation of Variances by Program

1.1 Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development Policy
Actual spending was $2.0 million higher than planned spending. The variance (+2.4%) is attributable to additional funding received through Supplementary Estimates for PSOPs in Budget 2016.

1.2 Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements
Actual spending was $61.2 million lower than planned spending. The variance (-6.4%) is attributable to unspent funds for the International Civil Aviation Organization headquarters in Montreal, as well as unspent funds on assessed contributions to international organizations.

2.1 International Commerce
Actual spending was $6.5 million lower than planned spending. The variance (-3.2%) is explained by unspent funds related to the Canadian International Innovation and the Global Commerce Support programs.

2.2 Consular Services and Emergency Management
Actual spending was $5.0 million lower than planned spending. The variance (-9.3%) is attributable to the expenditures transfer to another department (IRCC) of costs related to passport processing triggered by the increase in volumes, as well as delays in planned staffing.

3.1 International Security and Democratic Development
Actual spending was $227.3 million higher than planned spending. The variance (+95.6%) is the result of funding received through Supplementary Estimates for PSOPs, as well as funding received to provide humanitarian assistance to address the needs of people affected by ongoing conflicts, such as in South Sudan, Syria and Iraq.

3.2 International Development
Actual spending was $218.8 million higher than planned spending. The variance (+9.4%) is related to funding received through Supplementary Estimates to support developing countries address the impact of climate change, funding received to forgive debts relating to a loan made to the Republic of Cuba, as well as funding received to provide humanitarian assistance to address the needs of people affected by ongoing conflicts, such as in South Sudan, Syria and Iraq.

3.3 International Humanitarian Assistance
Actual spending was $290.1 million higher than planned spending. The variance (+51.6%) is attributable to funding received through Supplementary Estimates to provide humanitarian assistance for people affected by El Niño, conflicts (South Sudan, Syria and Iraq) and other humanitarian crises.

4.1 Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services
Actual spending was $62.9 million lower than planned spending. The variance (-8.2%) is the result of unspent funds related security investments at missions, the Paris and New-York chanceries relocation project, the consolidation of the High Commission of Canada in the United Kingdom, as well as delays in the development of other major projects.

4.2 Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad
Actual spending was $25.5 million higher than planned spending. The variance (+12.5%) is attributable to funding received through Supplementary Estimates to cover foreign inflation on allowances provided to Canadians working at missions abroad, as well as funding received for the locally engaged staff pensions, insurance and social security programs.

5.1 Internal Services
Actual spending was $10.3 million lower than planned spending. The variance (-4.2%) is attributable to unspent funds related to the delays in planned staffing and corporate initiatives.

Actual Human Resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (FTEs)
Actual Human Resources2014–15
Actual
2015–16
Actual
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2017–18
Planned
2018–19
Planned
1.1 Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development Policy854816830809832832
1.2 Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements1,5481,6441,6491,6361,6631,663
Subtotal2,4022,4602,4792,4452,4952,495
2.1 International Commerce1,2411,3111,3591,3381,3641,364
2.2 Consular Services and Emergency Management433371433420433433
Subtotal1,6741,6821,7921,7571,7971,797
3.1 International Security and Democratic Development225137156158168168
3.2 International Development786696882848892892
3.3 International Humanitarian Assistance554069697070
Subtotal1,0668731,1071,0741,1301,130
4.1 Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services4,0494,2874,1514,2954,1474,147
4.2 Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad545355495656
Subtotal4,1034,3404,2064,3444,2034,203
Internal Services1,7971,5331,5171,3821,5341,534
Subtotal1,7971,5331,5171,3821,5341,534
Total11,04210,88811,10111,00311,15911,159

From 2014-15 to 2019-20, Global Affairs Canada’s human resources remains constant. In 2016-17, the actual number of FTEs slightly exceeds the planned human resources. The variance forecasted between 2016-17 and 2017-18 reflects anticipated FTEs joining the department.

Expenditures by Vote

For information on the Global Affairs Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.Footnote vi

Alignment of Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 actual spending with the whole-of-government frameworkFootnote vii (dollars)
ProgramsSpending areaGovernment of Canada activity2016–17
Actual spending
1.1 Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development PolicyInternational AffairsA safe and secure world through international engagement84,371,569
1.2 Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International AgreementsInternational Affairs896,561,089
2.1 International CommerceInternational AffairsA prosperous Canada through global commerce193,902,346
2.2 Consular Services and Emergency ManagementInternational AffairsA safe and secure world through international engagement48,746,982
3.1 International Security and Democratic DevelopmentInternational AffairsA safe and secure world through international engagement465,232,381
3.2 International DevelopmentInternational AffairsGlobal poverty reduction through international sustainable development2,553,957,625
3.3 International Humanitarian AssistanceInternational Affairs852,045,849
4.1 Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common ServicesInternational AffairsA safe and secure world through international engagement702,069,649
4.2 Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment AbroadInternational Affairs229,333,161
Total spending by spending area (dollars)
Spending areaTotal planned spendingTotal actual spending
Economic affairsNot applicableNot applicable
Economic affairsNot applicableNot applicable
International affairs5,642,186,6336,260,024,806
Government affairsGovernment affairsNot applicable

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial Statements

Global Affairs Canada’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ending in March 31, 2017 are available on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer web page.Footnote viii

Financial Statements Highlights

The tables below illustrate the March 31, 2017 ending balances for each major financial statement grouping, along with the corresponding change from the planned results and the previous fiscal year.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the Year Ended March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information2016–17
Planned Results
2016–17
Actual
2015–16
Actual
Difference
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Difference
(2016-17 actual minus 2015-16 actual)
Total expenses5,415,110,0005,820,969,4695,765,171,470405,859,46955,797,999
Total revenues42,932,00035,732,96637,791,257(7,199,034)(2,058,291)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers5,372,178,0005,785,236,5035,727,380,213413,058,50357,856,290

The 2016-17 planned results information is provided in Global Affairs Canada’s Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and Notes 2016-17.Footnote ix

Expenses

The department’s total expenses increased by $55.8 million (+1 %) during 2016-17 compared to 2015-16. Higher grants and contributions payments are the main source of this difference, partly offset by a decrease in departmental operating expenses. The difference between actual expenses and planned results is mostly attributable to an increase in grants and contributions authorities during the fiscal year, which resulted in higher associated expenses. The distribution of expenses by PAA programs is presented in the following chart.

Expenses
Text Alternative

Expenses

  • International Development: 35.8%
  • Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements: 15.5%
  • International Humanitarian Assistance: 14.4%
  • Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services: 10.5%
  • Internal Services: 4.3%
  • International Security and Democratic Development: 7.9%
  • Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad: 4.2%
  • International Commerce: 4.7%
  • Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development Policy: 1.5%
  • Consular Services and Emergency Management: 0.9%

Revenues

The department’s total revenue decreased by $2 million (-5%) during 2016-17 compared to 2015-16. This is attributable to foreign currency fluctuations, which resulted in lower foreign currency gains this year. This was partly offset by an increase in the sales of goods and services. The difference between Global Affairs Canada’s earned and planned revenues was attributable to lower actual gains on disposal of departmental tangible capital assets, as well as lower gains on foreign currency exchange than planned.

The distribution of departmental revenues by type is presented in the following chart.

Revenue breakdown

Revenue breakdown
Text Alternative

Revenue breakdown

  • Sales of goods and services: 49.3%
  • Gain on disposal of tangible capital assets: 32.6%
  • Foreign exchange gain: 9.9%
  • Amortization of discount on loans: 5.6%
  • Other: 2.6%
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information2016–172015–16Difference (2016-17 minus (2015-16)
Total net liabilities1,159,627,6251,266,971,460(107,343,835)
Total net financial assets967,474,6981,056,473,744(88,999,046)
Departmental net debt192,152,927210,497,716(18,344,789)
Total non-financial assets1,479,407,9811,425,691,44353,716,538
Departmental net financial position1,287,255,0541,215,193,72772,061,327

Liabilities

The department’s total liabilities decreased by $107 million (-8 %) in 2016-17 compared to 2015-16. This is attributable to a net decrease in accounts payable to third parties resulting from timing differences in the settlement of the payables.

Liability Breakdown

Liability Breakdown
Text Alternative

Liability Breakdown

  • Accounts payable and accrued liabilities: 82.7%
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave: 3.7%
  • Employee future benefits: 10.5%
  • Deferred revenue: 3.1%

Asset breakdown

The department’s total financial and non-financial assets decreased by $35 million (-4%) in 2016-17 compared to 2015-16. The difference is attributable to a decrease in financial assets, more specifically the amount of the “Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF)”, which was partly offset by an increase in non-financial assets. The decrease in departmental liabilities (including accounts payables) caused a reduction in the current year balance of the amount due from the CRF. The increase in non-financial assets is explained by a relative increase in project costs and acquisitions of real-property assets abroad, which was offset in part by the amortization of these assets.

Asset breakdown

Asset breakdown
Text Alternative

Asset breakdown

  • Tangible capital assets: 59.6%
  • Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund: 32.4%
  • Accounts receivable and advances: 7.1%
  • Prepaid expenses: 0.8%

Supplementary Information

Corporate Information

Organizational profile

Appropriate ministers: Chrystia Freeland, Minister of Foreign Affairs; Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie; and François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of International Trade.

Institutional heads: Ian Shugart, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs; Timothy Sargent, Deputy Minister for International Trade; and Diane Jacovella, Deputy Minister of International Development.

Ministerial portfolio: Global Affairs Canada and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service. The following crown corporations operate at arm’s length and report to Parliament through the Global Affairs Canada’s ministers, the Canadian Commercial Corporation, Export Development Canada and the International Development Research Centre.

Enabling instrument: Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act, S.C. 2013, c. 33, s. 174.Footnote x

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1909

Reporting framework

Global Affairs Canada’s Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2016–17 are shown below.

Global Affairs Canada Program Alignment Architecture 2017-18
SO 1. Canada’s International AgendaSO 2. International Commercial and Consular Services for CanadiansSO 3. International Assistance and Poverty AlleviationSO 4. Canada’s Network Abroad
The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.The department maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.
Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development PolicyDiplomacy, Advocacy, and International AgreementsInternational CommerceConsular Services and Emergency ManagementInternational Security and Democratic DevelopmentInternational DevelopmentInternational Humanitarian AssistanceMission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common ServicesManagement of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad
  • International Information and Analysis
  • International Policy Advice
  • Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy
  • Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy
  • Assessed Contributions to International Organizations
  • Trade Agreements, Negotiations, Dispute Settlement and Controls
  • International Business Development Through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad
  • Foreign Direct Investment in Canada
  • International Innovation, Science and Technology
  • Consular Assistance for Canadians
  • Emergency Preparedness and Response
  • International Security and Threat Reduction
  • Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law
  • Sustainable Economic Growth
  • Children and Youth, Including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
  • Food Security
  • Multisector Assistance, Social Development, and Development Engagement
  • Humanitarian Programming
  • Partners for Humanitarian Assistance
  • Management of Common Services
  • Real Property
  • Security
  • Information Management/ Information Technology
  • Locally Engaged Staff Supporting Other Government Departments
  • Administration of Foreign Service  Directives
  • Administration of Locally Engaged Staff Pension, Insurance and Social Security Programs
Internal Services
  • Management and Oversight
  • Communications
  • Legal
  • Human Resources Management
  • Financial Management
  • Information Management
  • Information Technology
  • Real Property
  • Materiel
  • Acquisition

Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Supporting information on results, financial and human resources relating to Global Affairs Canada’s lower-level programs is available on TBS InfoBase.

Supplementary Information Tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Global Affairs Canada’s website:

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote xi This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

Global Affairs Canada
Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
TTY: 1-800-394-3472 (toll-free from the U.S. and Canada only); 613-944-1310 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709
www.international.gc.ca

Enquiries Services
Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0G2
Email: enqserv@international.gc.ca
Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709

Other Portfolio Related Contacts

Canadian Commercial Corporation
350 Albert Street, 7th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 0S6
Tel.: 1-800-748-8191 (toll-free in Canada)
613-996-0034 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-995-2121
www.ccc.ca

International Joint Commission (Canadian Section)
234 Laurier Avenue West, 22nd Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 6K6
Tel.: 613-995-2984
Fax: 613-993-5583
www.ijc.org

Export Development Canada
150 Slater Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 1K3
Tel.: 613-598-2500 (local); 1-800-229-0575 (toll-free North America)
TTY: 1-866-574-0451
Fax: 613-598-3811
www.edc.ca

Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission
459 Route 774
Welshpool, NB E5E 1A4
Tel.: 1-877-851-6663 (toll-free); 506-752-2922 (local)
Fax: 506-752-6000
http://www.fdr.net/

International Development Research Centre
150 Kent Street
Ottawa, ON K1P 0B2
Postal Address: P.O. Box 8500
Ottawa, ON K1G 3H9
Tel.: 613-236-6163
Fax: 613-238-7230
http://www.idrc.ca/

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary expenditures
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
Evaluation
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examining questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
Full time equivalent (FTE)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government-wide priorities
For the purpose of the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
Horizontal initiatives
An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
Non budgetary expenditures
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
Planned spending
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
Plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Results
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
Statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome
A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
Sunset program
A time limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
Target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
Voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Date Modified: